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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    It's natural to believe that external events upset you

    As I know, when something upsets me, I am disappointed or unhappy, but I can see some translations meaning "make someone get angry" for "upset", can it be used related to anger or are they mistranslations?

    ex)It's natural to believe that external events upset you.

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: It's natural to believe that external events upset you


  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: It's natural to believe that external events upset you

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    As I know, when something upsets me, I am disappointed or unhappy, but I can see some translations meaning "make someone get angry" for "upset", can it be used related to anger or are they mistranslations?

    ex)It's natural to believe that external events upset you.
    If you're asking whether "upset" can mean "angry" as well as "disappointed or unhappy", then yes it can.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: It's natural to believe that external events upset you

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    If you're asking whether "upset" can mean "angry" as well as "disappointed or unhappy", then yes it can.
    Can you tell when it means "angry"? I think I can't help but expect the answer related to the context, but I'd like to expect more. And I guess "angry" would happen much less than "disppointed or unhappy".

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: It's natural to believe that external events upset you

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Can you tell when it means "angry"? I think I can't help but expect the answer related to the context, but I'd like to expect more. And I guess "angry" would happen much less than "disppointed or unhappy".
    The answer is inevitably related to the context. From one sentence in isolation, it is almost impossible to say exactly what individual words mean. If you upset somebody you may make them unhappy, sad, worried, angry, etc. If I say, "I told the boss what I thought of his latest crazy scheme. I think I rather upset him", 'upset' is likely to mean 'made him angry'. In that particular, limited, context, the sense of 'angry' is probably more likely than 'disappointed'.

  6. keannu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: It's natural to believe that external events upset you

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    The answer is inevitably related to the context. From one sentence in isolation, it is almost impossible to say exactly what individual words mean. If you upset somebody you may make them unhappy, sad, worried, angry, etc. If I say, "I told the boss what I thought of his latest crazy scheme. I think I rather upset him", 'upset' is likely to mean 'made him angry'. In that particular, limited, context, the sense of 'angry' is probably more likely than 'disappointed'.
    Is it because "upset" has the nuance of disturb or confuse someone? If we analyze the word "upset", it is a composition of up+set, which can mean you shake something or somebody upward, so it seems to mean to disturb someone mentally, hence various meanings of "angry, disappointed, unhappy, etc". I'm not sure, but I guess it is.

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: It's natural to believe that external events upset you

    Most of us do not analyse the word when we use it. Like most words in the English language, its meaning is largely defined by the contexts in which we use it, and by the knowledge that both speaker and listener have of ways in which it is frequently used

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