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    #1

    as long as

    Hello dear,

    When you are talking about the future, we do not use will after unless/as long as/ provided/ providing/ so long as/ whereas.

    I couldn't find any right information about that and I would like to ask that that is correct or not.

    Thank you
    Last edited by aysaa; 26-Nov-2011 at 22:36.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: as long as

    I'd say you can, with a negative.

    As long as you keep up that attitude, mister, you will not be going to your friend's sleep over!

    Unless you get your chores done, we will not be going to the movies this afternoon.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. shannico's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: as long as

    If I understand correctly you have doubts regarding the use of will after unless, as long as, provided, providing in the subordinate clause ( the sentence stating the condition) and not in the main clause. In that case, no you can't, as all these connectors introduce a condition which cannot be expressed in the future or in the conditional.

    e.g. I will tell you a secret, as long as/provided you keep it to yourself

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: as long as

    Provided you keep studying, you will have no problem passing your exam.

    What's wrong with that?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: as long as

    I wanted to emphasize the main sentence.

    Unless/as long as/ provided/ providing/ so long as/ whereas I will...........

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: as long as

    Ah. You're right. Don't use that.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: as long as

    Quote Originally Posted by shannico View Post
    If I understand correctly you have doubts regarding the use of "will" after "unless", "as long as", "provided", "providing" in the subordinate clause ( the sentence stating the condition) and not in the main clause. In that case, no you can't, as all these connectors introduce a condition which cannot be expressed in the future or in the conditional.

    e.g. I will tell you a secret, as long as/provided you keep it to yourself
    If you will promise not to tell anybody, I'll tell you a secret.

    That is perfectly acceptable, with 'will' having the idea of BE willing.

    shannico, will you please separate the words you are talking about from the main text.It does not really matter whether you use single ('...') or double ("...") quotation marks, italics or bold fonts, but use one of them.

  6. shannico's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: as long as

    [QUOTE=5jj;826680]If you will promise not to tell anybody, I'll tell you a secret.

    That is perfectly acceptable, with 'will' having the idea of BE willing.

    That is more an exception to the norm than the norm itself.

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    #9

    Re: as long as

    Quote Originally Posted by shannico View Post
    That is more an exception to the norm than the norm itself.
    It is not an exception to anything. Will not infrquently has the meaning of Be willing:

    I'll carry your bag for you.
    Will you peel the potatoes, please?
    If you will come this way, I'll show you to your room
    .
    If you will read the letter more carefully, you will see what he means.

  8. shannico's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: as long as

    Of course will has that meaning. That is what makes it a modal verb.
    Plus "if" may be followed by "will" in indirect speech:

    e.g. I don't know if he'll come.

    However "if "followed by "will" is not as frequent as "if" followed by other tenses or modals in conditional clauses. And of course the same applies to "would".

    That is what I meant, and because we are talking about conditional clauses, if followed by will/would is not contemplated except in the case you stated, which is not the norm. That is what I meant. Sorry for not being clearer.

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