Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #1

    purpose clause

    1-To study architecture, Harry's father sent him to Italy.
    2-In order to study architecture, Harry's father sent him to Italy.

    Are these sentences acceptable if Harry is the one who is to study architecture?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #2

    Re: purpose clause

    Technically, no.
    Both say that it was Harry's father who was going to study.

    Most people use common sense and understand what you mean.

    In my opinion, you almost never need "In order to."

    Just reverse it: Harry's father sent him to Italy to study architecture. I find that better than the passive: To study architecture, Harry was sent by his father to Italy. (
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #3

    Re: purpose clause

    Thanks a lot BobD.

    Would any native-speaker use a sentence like these in speech or writing (if they are not drunk, etc.)?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,462
    #4

    Re: purpose clause

    You are always likely to encounter incorrect sentence structures even from native speakers.

    Our principal aim in communication is being understood. We are not always considering the most grammatical way to express ourselves.

    Does the same not apply to Armenian speakers?

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #5

    Re: purpose clause

    Thanks Rover.

    I can't answer your question because I am always drunk myself!

    No, I am kidding. You are quite right. But still, there are mistakes native speakers make and there are ones they (almost) never make. I mean there are times when I say something and I can see by the way they look at me that I have messed up!
    There are a variety of mistakes.

    Gratefully
    Navi

  2. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 245
    #6

    Re: purpose clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Technically, no.
    Both say that it was Harry's father who was going to study.

    Most people use common sense and understand what you mean.

    In my opinion, you almost never need "In order to."

    Just reverse it: Harry's father sent him to Italy to study architecture. I find that better than the passive: To study architecture, Harry was sent by his father to Italy. (
    Why does " Harry's father sent him to Italy to study architecture." meeans completely differently than "To study architecture., harry's father sent him to Italy."

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #7

    Re: purpose clause

    By the strictest rules of grammar (which ignore that people have common sense) the first one suggests that Harry's father sent Harry away, to Italy, so that Harry's father could devote time to studying architecture.

    To study architecture -- the noun that immediately follows this should be the person who is going to study architecture.
    So To study architecture, Harry's father -- This tells us that it's Harry's father who is going to study architecture.

    So, imagine this: Harry's mother lives in Italy. Harry lives with his father. Harry's father decides he wants to study architecture, which require full-time study and he won't have time to be a good father. To study architecture, Harry's father sent him Italy.

    But absent the situation I just described, most people would assign the same meaning - Harry is going to study architecture, and his father is helping him with this effort by sending him to Italy.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. if clause pst siple dependant clause future
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-Mar-2011, 17:31
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Apr-2010, 14:13
  3. purpose clause
    By navi tasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2008, 02:44
  4. Adverb Clause of reason an Adverb clause of purpose
    By vipreeth in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-Feb-2008, 14:05
  5. purpose clause
    By navi tasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-Mar-2005, 15:17

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •