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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    The more , the more

    Hi dear friends!
    What do you call the structure The more , the more and all other structures which we often use in English language?

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    #2

    Re: The more , the more

    I, for one, don't understand what you are asking about.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The more , the more

    Quote Originally Posted by Rekar View Post
    Hi dear friends!
    What do you call the structure "The more ..., the more ..." and all other structures which we often use in English language?
    You can't just include examples in your sentences without quoting them.
    I don't call that structure anything - though there might be a name for it.
    Most structures in English are not called anything, unless they fall into a few strictly defined concepts like "sentence, phrase, clause, adverbial prepositional phrase of time", etc. And many structures can be called different things depending on the need at the time.
    The structure of a language is called its syntax.

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    #4

    Re: The more , the more

    Quote Originally Posted by Rekar View Post
    Hi dear friends!
    What do you call the structure The more , the more and all other structures which we often use in English language?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I believe that you referring to a sentence such as "The more I know him, the more I like him." Am I correct?

    (2) According to my books, the ... the are called correlative adverbs. They are used in

    adverbial clauses of comparison.

    (3) If you have some good books (or find some good articles on the Internet), read

    all you can about the words that I have underlined.

    (4) Here are some examples from my books:

    The wealthier he grew, the stingier he seemed.
    The more he tried to speak plainly, the worse he stuttered.
    The faster we walk, the sooner we shall arrive.

    (5) If you have questions about a specific sentence, please post your question in

    this forum, and one of the excellent teachers will be delighted to answer you.

    Credits: Pence & Emery's A Grammar of Present-Day English.
    House & Harman's Descriptive English Grammar.

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