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    #1

    er or more; est or most

    A rule says: For 1-syllable adj.s/adv.s (and 2-syllable adj.s ending is y) 'er' is used and for the other adj.s 'more' is used before the adj.s.
    I am confused if there is any rule facing some exceptions like: simple, slowly, etc

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: er or more; est or most

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    A rule says: For 1-syllable adj.s/adv.s (and 2-syllable adj.s ending is y) 'er' is used and for the other adj.s 'more' is used before the adj.s.
    I am confused if there is any rule facing some exceptions like: simple, slowly, etc
    It would be better if you wrote the rule in understandable English. I could try to guess what you mean and give you an answer, but it could be misleading.

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    #3

    Re: er or more; est or most

    For one-syllable adjectives (and for two-syllable adjectives ending in y) 'er' is used to make their comparative adjectives, while for the other adjectives 'more' is used to.
    e.g.
    easy (two-syllable adj. ending in y) >> easier
    modern (two-syllable adj.) >> more modern
    However there are some exceptions like simple and slowly (as an adv.) because their comparative forms are simpler and more slowly.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

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    #5

    Re: er or more; est or most

    Thanks, is the rule correct for adverbs too?

  3. English Freak's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: er or more; est or most

    Yes, the rule is true for adverbs as well.

    To make comparatives:
    1) Add -er to one-syllable adjectives: tall --> taller
    2) Add more before the adjective if it has two syllables or more: exciting --> more exciting
    3) Remove y add -er to two-syllable adjectives ending in -y: happy --> happier
    4) Some comparative forms are irregular: good --> better, bad --> worse
    5) And we have some exceptions that don't fall into these categories: simple --> simpler

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: er or more; est or most

    Quote Originally Posted by English Freak View Post
    Yes, the rule is true for adverbs as well.

    To make comparatives:

    1) Add -er to one-syllable adjectives: tall --> taller
    2) Add more before the adjective if it has two syllables or more: exciting --> more exciting
    3) Remove y add -er to two-syllable adjectives ending in -y: happy --> happier
    4) Some comparative forms are irregular: good --> better, bad --> worse
    5) And we have some exceptions that don't fall into these categories: simple --> simpler
    The examples you give are adjectives, not adverbs.

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...tml#post827882

  5. English Freak's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: er or more; est or most

    Yes, of course. I know they're adjectives. I justed wanted to refer to the rules.
    My first sentence in my previous post just gives answer to atabitaraf's question.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: er or more; est or most

    When we give a 'rule' it is normally helpful if the words/sentences we offer are examples of the rules being followed. As it happens, your rule #3 examples work for many adjectives, but few adverbs.

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