Results 1 to 10 of 10
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Oct 2011
    • Posts: 10
    #1

    to humour

    Hello,

    Could "to humour" sound natural in the following context (it's a translation from Spanish to English)?

    "But...did she ever say that she didn't want sex?"
    Husband: "No, never, she always humoured me. Always."

    The verb needs to convey the idea that the woman always complies with her husband's sexual demands despite not wanting to engage in the act herself (in other words, she gives in to his demands to please him).

    Any suggestions are most welcome!

    Many thanks,

    Diafana

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #2

    Re: to humour

    Sounds OK to me. "Humored" might seem a bit condescending. Maybe "obliged" is a better word. Maybe not.

  1. SlickVic9000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2011
    • Posts: 1,019
    #3

    Re: to humour

    (Not a Teacher)

    I favor SoothingDave's suggestion of "obliged".

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: to humour

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Humored" might seem a bit condescending. Maybe "obliged" is a better word. Maybe not.
    I think it's the other way round, but (as SD said) maybe not.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Sep 2011
    • Posts: 172
    #5

    Re: to humour

    'Humoured' seems somehow wrong to me as well.

    She may have "stoically fulfilled her marital obligations"

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Oct 2011
    • Posts: 10
    #6

    Re: to humour

    Thanks to everybody for your invaluable feedback. The consensus seems to be that "to humour" isn't le mot juste in this particular context.

    Diafana

  3. ieltsonly's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 46
    #7

    Re: to humour

    We humour someone because of their beliefs, ideas, whims or fantasies and not their actions.

    Stephen
    http://www.ieltsonly.co.uk

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: to humour

    Quote Originally Posted by ieltsonly View Post
    We humour someone because of their beliefs, ideas, whims or fantasies and not their actions.
    I go with the Concise Oxford: "1. gratify or indulge (a person or taste, etc.). 2. adapt oneself to; make concessions to."

    "But...did she ever say that she didn't want sex?"
    Husband: "No, never, she always humoured me. Always."

    In that example, the wife allowing (possibly gracefully) her husband to have sex with her was humouring his taste/desire for sex, but it effectively comes to the same thing as humouring him for the act, in my opinion.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #9

    Re: to humour

    It sounds wrong to me, assuming the passage is meant to read without any irony.

    Solider: "Yes, I shot the prisoner, but only to humour my colleagues." This also sounds wrong, even though it might fit one dictionary definition. I can't remember having heard it used that way unless, as I say, it's used ironically.
    Last edited by Raymott; 02-Dec-2011 at 19:18.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #10

    Re: to humour

    I agree with 5jj. I can imagine the conversation going something like this:

    Husband: Fancy a shag?
    Wife: Not really, no.
    Husband: Oh. Damn. I really want sex.
    Wife: Well, that's no surprise.
    Husband: Oh come on. Humour me!
    Wife: OK. I will. As usual.

    She then lies back and thinks of England!

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] A sense of humour?
    By englishhobby in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Nov-2011, 07:43
  2. sense of humour
    By minajafari in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 28-Oct-2011, 23:26
  3. grave humour
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Sep-2010, 09:30
  4. Black humour
    By Ju in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-May-2010, 19:11
  5. offbeat humour
    By thx0110 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Dec-2009, 19:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •