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  1. david11's Avatar
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    #1

    Early and earlier

    Hello teachers,


    1)Please get started early next time.


    2)Please get started earlier next time.


    Are the above two sentences correct and same?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Early and earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    Hello teachers,


    1)Please get started early next time.


    2)Please get started earlier next time.


    Are the above two sentences correct and same?
    No, they aren't the same. 'Early' is a simple adverb. "Earlier" is a comparative. Their meanings can be found in any dictionary.
    The sentences are both grammatically correct, and they both have possible meanings. Would you like to try to work out the difference?
    Last edited by Raymott; 09-Dec-2011 at 20:52. Reason: correct grammar

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    #3

    Re: Early and earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    Hello teachers,


    1)Please get started early next time.


    2)Please get started earlier next time.


    Are the above two sentences correct and same?
    #1 is a broad or general reference for starting and suggests that the person(s) was (were) late. #2 requests that the person(s) start earlier than the previous time, but was (were) not necessarily late.

  3. david11's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Early and earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    #1 is a broad or general reference for starting and suggests that the person(s) was (were) late. #2 requests that the person(s) start earlier than the previous time, but was (were) not necessarily late.
    1)Please get started early next time.

    The person started late than he should have.


    2)Please get started earlier next time.

    The person may not have started late but it would be fine if he starts little soon.


    Is it correct? sir.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Early and earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    1)Please get started early next time.

    The person started later than he should have.


    2)Please get started earlier next time.

    The person may not have started late but it would be fine if he starts little soon.


    Is it correct? sir.
    No, it's not, it's the reverse.

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    #6

    Re: Early and earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    1)Please get started early next time.

    The person started later than he should have.


    2)Please get started earlier next time.

    The person may not have started late but it would be finebetter if he starts a little sooner.


    Is it correct? sir.
    See bhaisahab's response.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Early and earlier

    Sorry, what I wrote before was wrong. Both 'early' and 'earlier' are acting as adverbs here - though they can both be adjectives as well. I've corrected my original post.

    Here, "Early" is simply an adverb of time. "Start early"
    "Earlier" is a comparative. It relates to another time - probably the last time he started.
    They would both be adjectives in: "Please start at an early time" and "Please start at an earlier time".
    Whether they are used adjectivally or adverbially, the point is that "start early" simply means give yourself enough time, while "start earlier" means give yourself more time than you did last time.

  6. david11's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Early and earlier

    Thank you for your replies.



    Bhaisahab post seems to be contradicting post 3#.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Early and earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    Thank you for your replies.


    Bhaisahab post seems to be contradicting post 3#.
    Yes, it does seem to be. I agree with bhai. But they are both just guesses about the most likely context. Both sentences could be used in the same context.
    The main difference is that one is an ordinary modifying word - "early" - (whether it modifies the noun or the verb) and the other is a comparative. That's what you need to understand. Sometimes the difference is more obvious.

    Jack says to Peter:
    -1) "You need to be strong if you want to build the house yourself."
    Well, Peter might be strong, so 1. doesn't mean that Jack thinks Peter can't build the house.
    - 2) "You need to be stronger if you want to build the house yourself."
    2 does mean that Jack thinks Peter can't build the house because he is not strong enough.
    Last edited by Raymott; 10-Dec-2011 at 06:13.

  8. david11's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Early and earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, it does seem to be. I agree with bhai. But they are both just guesses about the most likely context. Both sentences could be used in the same context.
    The main difference is that one is an ordinary modifying word - "early" - (whether it modifies the noun or the verb) and the other is a comparative. That's what you need to understand. Sometimes the difference is more obvious.

    Jack says to Peter:
    -1) "You need to be strong if you want to build the house yourself."
    Well, Peter might be strong, so 1. doesn't mean that Jack thinks Peter can't build the house.
    - 2) "You need to be stronger if you want to build the house yourself."
    2 does mean that Jack thinks Peter can't build the house because he is not strong enough.
    Well explained sir.


    Thanks to all.

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