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  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #1

    To nick in behind everyone’s back

    Gareth: What do you think of her?
    Tim: A bit out of your league, mate.
    Ricky: Definitely out of your league.
    Gareth: No. Smug. You think you're so... just 'cause you got a bit of Donna because, I played by the rules 'cause she was out of bounds. You nicked in behind everyone’s back. I'd have got a bit if I'd known it was up for grabs. I'd have done her, but that would be shitting on your own doorstep.And anyway, I don't do sloppy seconds.
    This is a bit of dialogue from The Office (UK). "To nick" can mean "to steal", but why does he say "to nick in"? What does this mean?

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: To nick in behind everyone’s back

    NOT A TEACHER

    Are you sure it's nick? Usually the phrase is nip in behind [someone's] back. Nip means to move quickly in this context.

  2. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: To nick in behind everyone’s back

    I think the author means "snuck" (the past tense of sneak) more than he means to use the literal meaning of nick (to steal).

    John

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: To nick in behind everyone’s back

    Quote Originally Posted by iKitty View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    Are you sure it's nick? Usually the phrase is nip in behind [someone's] back. Nip means to move quickly in this context.
    You're right, it's "nip" not "nick". The English subtitles, from which I copied the phrase, were wrong.

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