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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question The name of this 'notice', please...

    Hi,

    May I know, please, what the name for the notice from a court is? This is the paper delivered to one's house asking them to present themselves to the court at a specified date.




    Thank you a lot!

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The name of this 'notice', please...

    It's called a "summons". You are being summoned to court.

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    #3

    Re: The name of this 'notice', please...

    It's a "summons" if you are the target of the court. A "subpoena" if you are being called to testify.

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The name of this 'notice', please...

    Thanks a lot to you both dears!

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The name of this 'notice', please...

    As far as I know, subpoena is not used in BrE (or rather, British law) - if we have any British legal experts on here, then please clarify.

    A witness (who presumably will expect to testify) will be called to court with a "witness summons", but any call to court in British and Scottish law is a "summons".

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: The name of this 'notice', please...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    As far as I know, subpoena is not used in BrE (or rather, British law) - if we have any British legal experts on here, then please clarify.
    NOT A Lawyer

    'Witness summons' is the name most commonly used in English law, though it is sometimes referred to as a 'subpoena'. In Scottish law (a very different system), it is generally known as a 'witness citation'.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: The name of this 'notice', please...

    In the US, jurors are summoned as well as defendants.

    I think that witnesses don't have to receive a subpoena (the can come voluntarily), but if they are being required to appear, they are subpoenaed.

    I was subpoenaed once in a nasty custody hearing. (I was the supervisor of the father. I would have gone voluntarily (the mother was so irresponsible!), but for some reason they thought I would appear more impartial if I was there in response to a subpoena.)

    Some of these things may vary from state to state.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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