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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Smile rise & arise

    "Misunderstandings arising from lack of social communication may lead to serious problems."
    My I use "rising" to substitute for "arising"?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: rise & arise

    The problems start as a result of the lack of social communications; 'arising' is the word.

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    #3

    Re: rise & arise

    Quote Originally Posted by *^^* View Post
    "Misunderstandings arising from lack of social communication may lead to serious problems."
    My I use "rising" to substitute for "arising"?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) What an interesting question.

    (2) May I add a few comments to the moderator's excellent answer?

    (a) I ran to consult my copy of Michael Swan's Practical English Usage (1995 edition, entry 59, page 53).

    He explains that "arise" means "begin" (just as the moderator told us). Then he writes:

    It is used mostly with abstract nouns as subjects. (You already know that abstract nouns are something that you cannot physically touch, such as "love," "hatred," "kindness," etc.)

    His examples:

    A discussion arose about the best way to pay.
    I'm afraid a difficulty has arisen.

    "Rise," he reminds us, usually means "go up":

    Prices keep rising.
    What time does the sun rise?

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