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    #1

    Unhappy Tenses

    My task was to correct 10
    mistakes deliberately made in the letter.


    The tenses I believed to be wrong I put into brackets, and next to them I suggested the right variant. Please:
    correct me if I found the mistakes exactly where they really were, and

    say if I corrected the found mistakes right; write.



    Dear Anna,
    You wanted to know if I (was passed) had passed my driving test. I should confess,
    I haven't. On my first test I (had run) ran out of petrol. Shortly after the restart the car (was stopping) stopped again, although I didn't brake. I (had tried) tried five times to restart it. The instructor got angry, he taught me how to restart a car. The examiner moved into the driving seat and I (had pushed) pushed the car to the nearest service station where I (pay) paid for the petrol. Then I (had tried) tried several times but the car wouldn't (start) have started. I (was feeling) felt awful. I am not surprised that I (failed) have failed the test.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by marin123 View Post
    You wanted to know if I (was passed) had passed (also: passed) my driving test. I should confess, I haven't didn't. On my first test I (had run ) ran out of petrol. Shortly after the restart the car (was stopping) stopped again, although I didn't brake ('hadn't braked' is better, in my opinion) I (had tried) tried five times to restart it. The instructor got angry, he taught me how to restart a car. The examiner moved into the driving seat and I (had pushed) pushed the car to the nearest service station where I (pay) paid for the petrol. Then I (had tried) tried several times but the car wouldn't (start) have started. I (was feeling) felt (Both are possible) awful. I am not surprised that I (failed) have failed the test.
    Also possible for the first part is:

    You wanted to know if I have passed my my driving test (yet). I should confess, I haven't.

    I prefer 'must' or 'have to' to 'should' in 'I should confess', but that's not a question of tense.

  2. Bennevis's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Tenses

    Here is how I'd do it:

    Dear
    Anna,

    You wanted to know if I (had) passed my driving test. I should confess, I (haven't) didn't. On my first test I ran out of petrol. Shortly after the restart the car stopped again, although I didn't brake. I tried five times to restart it. The instructor got angry, he taught me how to restart a car. The examiner moved into the driving seat and I pushed the car to the nearest service station where I paid for the petrol. Then I tried several times but the car wouldn't start. I felt awful. I am not surprised that I failed the test.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by Bennevis View Post
    Here is how I'd do it:

    Dear
    Anna,

    You wanted to know if I (had) passed my driving test. I should confess, I (haven't) didn't. On my first test I ran out of petrol. Shortly after the restart the car stopped again, although I didn't brake. I tried five times to restart it. The instructor got angry, he taught me how to restart a car. The examiner moved into the driving seat and I pushed the car to the nearest service station where I paid for the petrol. Then I tried several times but the car wouldn't start. I felt awful. I am not surprised that I failed the test.
    "I felt awful." As 5jj said, here both are possible.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Quote:
    ... Shortly after {Should be: after I restarted the car} the restart the car (was stopping) stopped again, although I didn't {Should be: use the brake or apply the brakes}brake. I (had tried) tried five times to restart it.
    I think ‘shortly after the restart’ is fine – particularly if it is the test, rather than the car, that has been restarted.

    I see nothing wrong in using ‘brake’ as a verb.

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    #6

    Re: Tenses

    But here should be TEN mistakes to be correct :(((((( And with your corrections there are only nine of them left :(((((

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Tenses

    If the original text was as I have printed it below, there are 8 tense mistakes (underlined) and one possible mistake (underlined + (?)). There are two other slips (in red). That’s how I see it.

    You wanted to know if I was passed my driving test. I should confess,
    I haven't. On my first test I had run out of petrol. Shortly after the restart the car was stopping again, although I didn't brake (?). I had tried five times to restart it. The instructor got angry, he taught me how to restart a car. The examiner moved into the driving seat and I had pushed the car to the nearest service station where I pay for the petrol. Then I had tried several times but the car wouldn't start. I was feeling awful. I am not surprised that I failed the test.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    "Shortly after the restart the car (was stopping) stopped again"

    Yes, I suppose one could use that term. From the text there is a strong indication that it was the car that was started again. Using "brake" as a verb...hmmm..."Do you brake on curves?" Brake could be used this way but isn't it rather awkward? Brake sounds too much like break - "Do you brake on curves? No, I'm fine after each curve."
    In BrE, "to brake" is absolutely fine and very common. In fact, "to apply the brakes" etc would sound unnatural.

    I failed my test for braking too late.
    He brakes on corners.
    If you don't brake soon you're going to crash into the back of that lorry.
    I braked far too late and spun off the road.

    Learners just need to remember that it's:

    break / broke / has broken
    brake / braked / has braked

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    #9

    Re: Tenses

    thank you very much :)))) You helped me a lot!!!

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    #10

    Re: Tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Using "brake" as a verb...hmmm..."Do you brake on curves?" Brake could be used this way but isn't it rather awkward? Brake sounds too much like break - "Do you brake on curves? No, I'm fine after each curve."
    In some of my many incarnations, I have been a cycling proficiency instructor, a motor cycle instructor/examiner and a (car) driving instructor and instructor trainer. If I had got there first, I would have said exactly what emsr2d2 wrote in her last post. It is incredibly unlikely, in BrE at least, that anyone would misunderstand "Do you /breɪk/ on curves?"

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