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  1. Banned
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    #1

    Arrow A Deal With

    A. "A business deal with Michael would be beneficial to Peter." B. "Peter agreed on a business deal with Michael."

    The correctness of A leads to some confusion about B. From A, I could see that "a business deal with Michael" is a valid noun phrase, where "with Michael" modifies "a business deal".
    In B, does "with Michael" modifies "business deal" or "agreed"? B has two slightly different interpretations:


    B1. "Peter and Michael agreed on (signed) a business deal."

    B2. "A business deal that involved Michael was agreed on (signed) by Peter."


    What should I do?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A Deal With

    Quote Originally Posted by Katiemm View Post
    A. "A business deal with Michael would be beneficial to Peter."
    B. "Peter agreed on a business deal with Michael."

    The correctness of A leads to some confusion about B. From A, I could see that "a business deal with Michael" is a valid noun phrase, where "with Michael" modifies "a business deal".
    In B, does "with Michael" modifies "business deal" or "agreed"? B has two slightly different interpretations:


    B1. "Peter and Michael agreed on (signed) a business deal." Yes, except that "agreeing on" and "signing" are not synonymous. But I don't think that's your issue.

    B2. "A business deal that involved Michael was agreed on (signed) by Peter." Yes, but the business deal doesn't just involve Michael. Michael is a signatory or party to the deal, and must agree on it.
    For example we could say, "A deal was made by the divorcing parents involving the children." Here, the children are involved, but they have no say in the deal.


    What should I do?
    What are your options?
    It seems to me that we have two men, Peter and Michael. There is a possible business deal to be made between them. Peter decides that the deal would be beneficial (A). Peter agrees to the deal (B).

    It is not stated, but could be inferred, that Michael also thought the deal would be beneficial, and from B that "Michael agreed on a business deal with Peter." That is, they mutually agreed on a business deal because both men felt that it was to their mutual advantage.

    Perhaps you could state the problem in a different way if you're still confused?
    Last edited by 5jj; 18-Dec-2011 at 08:33.

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