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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    Discuss the difference

    This is a question I made, but it looks a little awakward, I made a question for this on this website before, and I'd like to complement it. My point was to deliver the difference of "a" and "the" when a means one of many(unspecific), while the means "unique" or "specific". How shall I modify it?

    Q. Discuss the difference of the two sentences
    1) I am a student of YD High School.
    2) I am the student of YD High School.
    Anwer - 1) refers to "I am one of many students of YD High School", while 2)refers to "I am the only one student of the school."

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Discuss the difference

    Let's say someone asks you where you go to school:
    I'm a student at Suffern High School.

    Let's say you're at a competition with one student from each of several school. The organizer says "I need the student from Suffern. Where's Suffern's representative?"
    I"m the student from Suffern.

    I can't make "I'm the student at... " sound normal unless it one a one-student school.

    I wouldn't use"of."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Discuss the difference

    Did you mistype for "unless it is one-student" for the underlined? Can you clarify it?
    I can't make "I'm the student at... " sound normal unless it one a one-student school.

    Anyway, you mean "I'm the student at(of) a school" sounds awkward when there is no context related to a specific student in an event or something. So I'd better use "I'm from a school" for an event or situation, right?

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Discuss the difference

    Yes, I omitted the word by accident.

    I don't know what you mean in your new question. I thought you were talking about "the student" not "the school."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Discuss the difference

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Yes, I omitted the word by accident.

    I don't know what you mean in your new question. I thought you were talking about "the student" not "the school."
    By "I'm the student at YD High School" , I meant one a one-student school where there goes only one student with all the other students dropped out. It's a rare imaginary situation, but just to compare "a" and "the", I made it. So is it possible to say "I am the student at some school"?
    Someone said only "I am the only student at ,,," works, but you seem to have mentioned only "the" can work.
    Last edited by keannu; 19-Dec-2011 at 07:41.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Discuss the difference

    Sorry, I'm still not following.

    Someone said only "I am the only student at ,,," works, but you seem to have mentioned only "the" can work.
    I'm the only student at ... is grammatically possible.

    Then you said that I said "the" could work, as though that were contradicting the prior statement.

    (Do you think there is much value in spending time figuing out how to express imaginary situations?)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. keannu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Discuss the difference

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Sorry, I'm still not following.



    I'm the only student at ... is grammatically possible.

    Then you said that I said "the" could work, as though that were contradicting the prior statement.

    (Do you think there is much value in spending time figuing out how to express imaginary situations?)
    Okay, I amended my question like this replacing the concept of uniqueness with specificity. Please confirm to me if it's correct to finalize my question.
    In 2, it could be an aswer from a student participating in a contest like this.
    (Organizer - Who is the representative from YD High School?
    Student - Sir, I am the student from YD High School)

    Q. Discuss the difference of the two sentences
    1) I am a student at YD High School.
    2) I am the student from YD High School.
    Anwer - 1) refers to "I am one of many students at YD High School", while 2)refers to "I am the specific student from the school."

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Discuss the difference

    That makes sense to me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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