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    #1

    adjectives-grammar

    Hello again,

    I am interested in adjectives such as "red-nosed", "long-sleeved", "left-handed", "long-legged"...... My question is about where to find out more about this type of adjectives and how to form them.

    Can you tell me where I could get any information about this subject?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: adjectives-grammar

    These sorts of adjectives are created by English speakers and writers to supply a concept for which no single word suffices. They mean that the the noun modified possesses the qualities of the second word to the degree of the first word. For instance, 'long-lived' means that something has existence for a lengthy period of time; 'It was a long-lived debate' means that it was an arguement that lasted for a while. Some of these compounds are used so frequently that you see them without the hyphen. For example, short-sighted means that someone posses the ability to see but not very far; it is often written 'shortsighted.'

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: adjectives-grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Preceptor View Post
    These sorts of adjectives are created by English speakers and writers to supply a concept for which no single word suffices. They mean that the the noun modified possesses the qualities of the second word to the degree of the first word. For instance, 'long-lived' means that something has existence for a lengthy period of time; 'It was a long-lived debate' means that it was an arguement that lasted for a while. Some of these compounds are used so frequently that you see them without the hyphen. For example, short-sighted means that someone posses the ability to see but not very far; it is often written 'shortsighted.'
    Thank you for your help. I have already found out about how they are called: Compound adjectives.

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