Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. lst715's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jul 2011
    • Posts: 19
    #1

    sweep in from the desert?

    Hello, ma teacher!

    I don't get the usage of "in" in this phrase: sweep in from the desert

    I read this in Bible and this is the full text: Your sons and daughters were feasting and drinking wine at the oldest brother's house, when suddenly a mighty wind swept in from the desert and struck the four corners of the house.

    What I want to know is ... how can I understand this expression: sweep in from
    I know why "from" is used. It means "from the desert."

    Is "sweep in" kind of idiom?

    The reason why I am curious is that I think "in" looks unnecessary.

    Please let me know how I should understand this

  2. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: sweep in from the desert?

    It means to come in(side) swiftly, strongly; e.g., the wind came in(side) swiftly.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #3

    Re: sweep in from the desert?

    I feel that it means 'towards' (the location we know about) rather than 'inside'.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #4

    Re: sweep in from the desert?

    [QUOTE=lst715;834830]


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) May I add a few words to the key member's and the moderator's excellent answers.

    (2) I found three examples (Google books) that may help you to better

    understand that "sweep in" means something like "come in":


    (a) Rain swept in from the mountains.

    (b) The cold breeze swept in from the bay.

    (c) A hundred angry letters swept in from across the nation.

    (3) As you know. many times we use "sweep" without "in":

    I sweep the kitchen every day.

    (4) I do not think that "sweep in" is considered an idiom. I think that it is considered

    a phrasal verb. When you get time, you may wish to research the topic "phrasal

    verbs" by checking your books, this website's "search" box, or the Web.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-Dec-2011, 23:39
  2. sweep me away = sweep my heart = sweep my heart away?
    By iamtime in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Feb-2011, 19:53
  3. desert and deserted
    By greegorush in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 17-Jul-2010, 18:24
  4. dust bowl/desert
    By GUEST2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Nov-2009, 02:23

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •