Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2004
    • Posts: 1,074
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    fixed

    You need to break away from fixed attitudes and prejudices.

    Does 'fixed' above modify both 'attitudes' and 'prejudices'? Or 'attitudes' alone?

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,125
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: fixed

    When the two nouns (attitudes and prejudices) are similar, you can assume it modifies both. Usually, it does, in any case.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2004
    • Posts: 1,074
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: fixed

    At first, I thought so, but later I thought 'attitudes' alone here didn't really make sense whereas 'prejudices' alone seemed to work, so I asked the question.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 1,984
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: fixed

    Because the term "prejudices" embodies the idea of strongly, and often stubbornly held preconceptions, in a sense they are already "fixed". And so, in this case "fixed" is most applicable to "attitudes" and is, perhaps, redundant for "prejudices". But it does serve to reinforce the point.
    However in: "Her cooking always involves the most exotic tastes and aromas", "exotic" would be read as qualifying both nouns, as konungursvia says.

    not a teacher

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,125
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: fixed

    I don't think 'prejudice' always refers to strong, dogmatic preconceptions. As most of us know, it refers to judgments formed before the evidence is revealed in full. To me, the concept of time is central, the idea of stubbornness probably isn't. Just my thoughts. In legal English, it also refers to any harm, however minor.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 1,984
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: fixed

    @konungursvia: Thanks, you're right. I didn't mean to suggest that my reading of "prejudices" in this example represents the only definition.
    I agree, of course, that the concept of time is central, but I feel that in general conversation the sense of stubbornness is often strongly implied and that's how I read it here.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] has been fixed/was fixed
    By supada in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2009, 03:51
  2. fixed 50
    By Hanka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Oct-2006, 21:47
  3. Fixed Syllabus
    By yas61 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-Feb-2006, 09:52
  4. Printables Fixed
    By Red5 in forum News and Announcements
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 25-Sep-2004, 23:21
  5. How are you fixed
    By Francois in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-Jul-2004, 20:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •