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  1. Supermonkey's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Type three conditional sentence

    Hello Merry Christmas,

    Can I ask a conditional sentence, please? I think it's type three.

    Is my sentence correct below?

    If I hadn't met Michelle, I might/would have not known how to make delicious dessert.

    Thank you.

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Type three conditional sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Supermonkey View Post
    Hello Merry Christmas,

    Can I ask a conditional sentence, please? I think it's type three.

    Is my sentence correct below? No

    If I hadn't met Michelle, I might/would have not known how to make delicious dessert.

    Thank you.
    Try these.
    If I hadn't met Michele, I wouldn't have known how to make this/that delicious dessert. (3rd conditional)
    If I hadn't met Michele, I wouldn't know how to make this delicious dessert. (Mixed conditional)

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    #3

    Re: Type three conditional sentence

    [QUOTE=Supermonkey;836320]

    If I hadn't met Michelle, I might/would have not known how to make delicious dessert.


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I think that your sentence is GREAT.

    (a) You just might want to make three little changes:

    (i) I would prefer "learned" rather than "known."

    (ii) the position of "not": might/would not have learned ....

    (iii) I think it should be desserts.

    (2) IMHO, I think that your choice of modal also makes a difference:

    (a) I might not have learned. = But if I had not met Michelle, there would have been the

    possibility that someone else would have taught me.

    (b) I would not have learned. = If I had not met Michelle, I would have never learned

    to make delicious desserts. She was my only chance.

  3. Supermonkey's Avatar
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    #4

    Lightbulb Re: Type three conditional sentence

    [QUOTE=TheParser;836324]
    Quote Originally Posted by Supermonkey View Post

    If I hadn't met Michelle, I might/would have not known how to make delicious dessert.


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I think that your sentence is GREAT.

    (a) You just might want to make three little changes:

    (i) I would prefer "learned" rather than "known."

    (ii) the position of "not": might/would not have learned ....

    (iii) I think it should be desserts.

    (2) IMHO, I think that your choice of modal also makes a difference:

    (a) I might not have learned. = But if I had not met Michelle, there would have been the

    possibility that someone else would have taught me.

    (b) I would not have learned. = If I had not met Michelle, I would have never learned

    to make delicious desserts. She was my only chance.
    Thanks for your explanations.

    If I want to use salad instead of desserts , should I use plural too? salads?

    cheers!

  4. Supermonkey's Avatar
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    #5

    Question Re: Type three conditional sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Try these.
    If I hadn't met Michele, I wouldn't have known how to make this/that delicious dessert. (3rd conditional)
    If I hadn't met Michele, I wouldn't know how to make this delicious dessert. (Mixed conditional)
    Thank you for the mixed conditional. It's very complicated to me.

    I remember my English teacher told me mixed conditional is usually with type three and type two. Mixing type one and type two are not common. (Or are not correct? I can't remember exactly.)

    I am confused it all the time. For instance, If the sentences are correct below? (Type1+Type2)

    If you are late again, I wouldn't be your friend any more. (I know he will definitely late, and I am kidding that we were not friends soon.)

    If you won one million dollars, will you make a 20% donation? (If I use past tense in second sentence, will it mean the guy highly hasn't got the intention to donate?)

    If you pouch the wall, you could break your bone. (He is going to punch, and I imagine it has the risk to break his hand.)

    Thank you so much.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Type three conditional sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Supermonkey View Post
    Thank you for the mixed conditional. It's very complicated to me.

    I remember my English teacher told me mixed conditional is usually with type three and type two. Mixing type one and type two are not common. (Or are not correct? I can't remember exactly.)

    I am confused it all the time. For instance, If the sentences are correct below? (Type1+Type2)

    If you are late again, I wouldn't be your friend any more. (I know he will definitely late, and I am kidding that we were not friends soon.)
    If you are late again, I won't be your friend any more.

    If you won one million dollars, will you make a 20% donation? (If I use past tense in second sentence, will it mean the guy highly hasn't got the intention to donate?)
    If you win one million dollars, will you make a 20% donation?
    If you won one million dollars, would you make a 20% donation?


    If you pouch the wall, you could break your bone. (He is going to punch, and I imagine it has the risk to break his hand.)
    If you punch the wall, you could break your hand.

    Thank you so much.
    See above. Note that the verb you need in your final sentence is "punch".

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    #7

    Re: Type three conditional sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Supermonkey View Post

    If I want to use salad instead of desserts , should I use plural too? salads?

    cheers!


    Great question! Let's see what the teachers tell us. (We non-teachers are

    warned NOT to answer unless we are confident.)

  6. Supermonkey's Avatar
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    #8

    Question Re: Type three conditional sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If you are late again, I wouldn't be your friend any more. (I know he will definitely late, and I am kidding that we were not friends soon.)
    If you are late again, I won't be your friend any more.
    I am confused.
    The second sentence didn't use past tense. I remember type one is talking about something will happen, and type two is a kind of imagination. For example, If I were king, you should be queen.
    Therefore, does it mean I won't be her/his friend if she/he is really late?


    If you won one million dollars, will you make a 20% donation? (If I use past tense in second sentence, will it mean the guy highly hasn't got the intention to donate?)
    If you win one million dollars, will you make a 20% donation?
    If you won one million dollars, would you make a 20% donation?

    If I use type one, does it mean the guy will probably win the game/lottery?

    If you pouch the wall, you could break your bone. (He is going to punch, and I imagine it has the risk to break his hand.)
    If you punch the wall, you could break your hand.
    In this sentence, are they both type one?
    Thank you so much. My questions are in green colours above.

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Type three conditional sentence

    My advice would be: stop worrying about labelling. There aren't three (or four, or five) types of conditional sentence - there are more than fifty.

    When we consider the verb in the if-clause, we are concerned with whether or not the hypothetical situation is presented as a real possibility (in which case there is no shifting of tense to a distanced/remote/'past' form) or whether it is presented as an unlikely/unreal possibility (in which case there is a shifting).

    Once we have that part clear, then we can begin to think about the consequential clause, and how real that might be.

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    #10

    Re: Type three conditional sentence

    [QUOTE=Supermonkey;836343]

    If I want to use salad instead of desserts , should I use plural too? salads?


    If someone does not answer you soon, you might want to post this

    question in a new thread.

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