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    #1

    For & In

    Hi teachers, I have a question:

    1. I haven't played football for two days.
    2. I haven't played football in two days.

    Are they the same? if not, what is the difference between them?

    Thanks

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: For & In

    When used with the negative and a sense of the past, I really sense no difference between them. Three days ago, you played football and you have not played since then.

    However, "I will play football for two days" and "I will play football in two days" have different meantings.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: For & In

    [QUOTE=pubctx;836838]

    1. I haven't played football for two days.
    2. I haven't played football in two days.

    Are they the same? if not, what is the difference between them?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) As I understand it, No. 1 is more popular in British English; No.2, in American

    English.

    (2) I learned this a few years ago when I read a sentence something like this

    in a British newspaper:

    This is the first time for three years that The Times has been prohibited

    in [name of country].

    I think that most Americans would definitely use "in" in such a sentence.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: For & In

    [QUOTE=TheParser;836851]
    Quote Originally Posted by pubctx View Post

    1. I haven't played football for two days.
    2. I haven't played football in two days.

    Are they the same? if not, what is the difference between them?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) As I understand it, No. 1 is more popular in British English; No.2, in American

    English.

    (2) I learned this a few years ago when I read a sentence something like this

    in a British newspaper:

    This is the first time for three years that The Times has been prohibited

    in [name of country].

    I think that most Americans would definitely use "in" in such a sentence.
    Yes, #1 is more widely used in BrE but I hear quite a few young people using #2 these days.

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    #5

    Re: For & In

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    When used with the negative and a sense of the past, I really sense no difference between them. Three days ago, you played football and you have not played since then.
    Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    However, "I will play football for two days" and "I will play football in two days" have different meantings.
    I know the difference here, it's very clear, thanks.

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