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    #1

    to freak out - to creep out

    I have doubts about these two verbs and about how to use them properly.
    1) Let's start with saying that I got that both of them are synonyms of "to scare" and "to frighten". Is this correct?
    2) After checking them out several times in more than one dictionary I've come to the conclusion that in English (I don't know if it's the same both inAmerican E and British E) you tend to use "to creep out" when something or someone scares someone else and, at the same time, disgusts someone...

    Ex. I saw a spider today. They always creep me out. (Because I'm scared of them and I do not like them either)

    You tend to use "to freak out" when something or someone scares someone else but there's no shred of disgust or repugnance...

    Ex. Did you see that lightning? Wow! It freaked me out. (It scared me but I don't say whether I like lightnings or not...)

    Am I right up to this point?

    But, what about these sentences?
    1) Snakes always creep me out.
    2) Snakes always freak me out.
    3) Seeing that dead body creeped me out.
    4) Seeing that dead body freaked me out.

    Please, correct me if I'm wrong, but I think these four sentences mean all the same with just a difference: the ones with "creep out" underlines that I'm frightened and also disgusted; the ones with "freak out" highlight that I'm just scared and in this sense "to freak out" is a more appropriate synonyms of "to scare", whereas "to creep out" adds a different shade of meaning...so it's not only fear, but also disgust...

    I would like to thank in advance whoever will help me to understand these two verbs.

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    #2

    Re: to freak out - to creep out

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Gil
    Thanks so much for the answer Gill,
    but how to use them correctly without making any mistakes?

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    #3

    Re: to freak out - to creep out

    Any native speaker who can help me with this?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to freak out - to creep out

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Any native speaker who can help me with this?
    I am not familiar with "to creep out". Except in the literal sense.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to freak out - to creep out

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I am not familiar with "to creep out". Except in the literal sense.
    Neither am I.

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    #6

    Re: to freak out - to creep out

    what would it be the literal sense?
    Do you think "to freak out" is a perfect synonym of "to scare" or "to frighten"? Any difference?

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to freak out - to creep out

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    what would it be the literal sense?
    Have a look at this link: creep verb - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online

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