Page 4 of 5 First 1 2 3 4 5 Last
Results 31 to 40 of 44

    • Join Date: Oct 2005
    • Posts: 25
    #31

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordic Bill
    No charge!
    hihihihi :)

    Tell you what, everyone in this forum is welcome to have lunch or dinner in our house.
    Don't worry, we don't have to speak english. sign language is fine.

    Kindest - Ana


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #32

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    Thanks for your gracious offer, Ana! Mind you, I don't know how many of us there are out here, so paper plates might be a sensible solution!


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #33

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    There does seem to be a tendency among many younger speakers in the UK to drop a lot of prepositions. You here things like 'go toilet' and prepositions after verbs are missed too.

    I also think that as non-native speakers become more confident about using English, then they will start changing things- the majority of English use nowadays is betwen non-native speakers- and this will have a greater impact in the future, so we may see some radical shifts in prepositional usage in the future. Maybe in twenty years, all your work on prepositions will ave become redundant. The trouble is you'll probably feel that everybody should have to go through what you went through and lament the good old days when prepositions were hard.
    My Gosh - what a scary thought! Yikes!

    True, I have noticed one strange and new phenomenon relating to prepositions and that is the tendency to end a sentence with the word "with". I sat up bolt upright when I first heard a teenager in some US series ask her friends "Do you want to come with"? Here, however, there would probably be more focus on missing pronouns than incorrect prepositional usage, but it hit me like a ton of bricks: that is a direct translation of that same question in the Scandinavian languages, German (probably Dutch, too)! Uncanny how that has slipped into English usage! I even heard Jerry Seinfeld use it in one of his earlier episodes, mentioning to one of his friends that "You strike me as the 'come with' sort of guy", which makes this "new" phenomenon a good 14-15 years old!


    • Join Date: Oct 2005
    • Posts: 25
    #34

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordic Bill
    Thanks for your gracious offer, Ana! Mind you, I don't know how many of us there are out here, so paper plates might be a sensible solution!
    You're welcome.
    I don't care how many. I live in small province near the beach. Nothing spectacular - a small hut but my dad built a big tree house close to the water falls. I live in a third world country; we're poor but I very much enjoy our white sand, clear water, exotic fishes.....
    I think everyone would enjoy it. My dad is a fisherman and we get our food right from the farm & sea - so it's all fresh.
    All you can eat for everyone!
    We're natives and we don't have any fancy and comfortable chair or bed - everything is made of bamboo but our pillows are soft. We don't have paper plates, we use banana leaves as plates. My mother and I do the cutting! :)
    I'll be right back, my mom ask me to wash the vegetables.
    love - ana

  1. M56
    Guest
    #35

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordic Bill
    My Gosh - what a scary thought! Yikes!

    True, I have noticed one strange and new phenomenon relating to prepositions and that is the tendency to end a sentence with the word "with". I sat up bolt upright when I first heard a teenager in some US series ask her friends "Do you want to come with"? Here, however, there would probably be more focus on missing pronouns than incorrect prepositional usage, but it hit me like a ton of bricks: that is a direct translation of that same question in the Scandinavian languages, German (probably Dutch, too)! Uncanny how that has slipped into English usage! I even heard Jerry Seinfeld use it in one of his earlier episodes, mentioning to one of his friends that "You strike me as the 'come with' sort of guy", which makes this "new" phenomenon a good 14-15 years old!
    I've been using "Are you coming with?", and similar, all my life (for about 45 years). It's common in NW England.

    Talking about bolts and uprights... I was bolted upright by your use of "telephones" below. Is that AmEng for telephone numbers?

    <What do you call the list a group of students fills out at the beginning of a course or school term with their names and telephones on it? >


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #36

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    Hey there! That's a funny coincidence. My parents are from Bolton and my first dialect is what you would term as WW2 Lancashire. Nobody south of their 50th birthday speaks that way anymore, or so I've been told.

    I had no idea the "with"-thing was so established in Northern English usage. I most certainly never heard it until I heard it on TV. Somehow it made its way to Studio City, Ca.!

    There is a lot of Scandinavian influence in the English dialects of the NW. I got started on a list a couple of years ago, but only listed about 7 or 8 examples. Eg. "skriking kids" (skrike means scream both in Northern English and Norwegian)!

    That must have been a slip on my part (telephones vs. telephone numbers). I didn't see it when I was proofing my posting. Phone numbers would probably have been the better choice.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 70,894
    #37

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    I've heard the 'come with' in London, so maybe it is spreading.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #38

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordic Bill
    Jerry Seinfeld use it in one of his earlier episodes, mentioning to one of his friends that "You strike me as the 'come with' sort of guy", which makes this "new" phenomenon a good 14-15 years old!
    About 15 years ago, after graduating from university, some friends and I took a trip to visit London. One early, rainy morning, as my friends were preparing to leave the hotel for breakfast, one friend asked, "Do you wanna come with?", to which I replied, "Come with what?" I was also somewhat confused about how to interpret the "come with" part, and I'm Canadian. Seems to me that "come with" has been around for some time, and that it's not just 14 to 15 year olds that are using it. I believe it reflects, or at least used to reflect yuppy-type language, and the reason Seinfeld refers to it.

  4. M56
    Guest
    #39

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordic Bill
    Hey there! That's a funny coincidence. My parents are from Bolton and my first dialect is what you would term as WW2 Lancashire. Nobody south of their 50th birthday speaks that way anymore, or so I've been told.

    I had no idea the "with"-thing was so established in Northern English usage. I most certainly never heard it until I heard it on TV. Somehow it made its way to Studio City, Ca.!

    There is a lot of Scandinavian influence in the English dialects of the NW. I got started on a list a couple of years ago, but only listed about 7 or 8 examples. Eg. "skriking kids" (skrike means scream both in Northern English and Norwegian)!

    That must have been a slip on my part (telephones vs. telephone numbers). I didn't see it when I was proofing my posting. Phone numbers would probably have been the better choice.
    I lived in Bolton (Park Rd) for a couple of years during the 70s. Goood town.

    Yes, scream is also "skrige" in Danish, where I once lived for 6 years.

    Some say that the word "free" comes from the Viking word "Friga", the queen of the Norse gods.

    In fact, our language is highly eclectic and influenced by words and expressions from numerous sources.

    This article proves as much:

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15755...5-h.htm#chapIX


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #40

    Re: HELP w/ prepositions in and on.

    I lived in Bolton (Park Rd) for a couple of years during the 70s. Goood town.
    Unfortunately, I'm not familiar with the various locales of Bolton, but I agree - it is a nice place to be. Very friendly people. I'll be spending Christmas there and I'm looking forward to it.

    Yes, scream is also "skrige" in Danish, where I once lived for 6 years.
    True enough. I really get a kick out of these viking remnants in modern day English! I'll bet you noticed the cans of "Skipper Labskovs" on supermarket shelves here, the same word as "lobscouse" in Lancashire!

    If you feel like mailing me off-side, I'd be more than interested in hearing about your stay in Denmark. (I'm only suggesting off-side since we're drifting slightly off the topic at hand and everyone has to read this)!

    Sorry, gang!

    Great link to the English dialects - thanks a lot! I've bookmarked it.

    Bill

Page 4 of 5 First 1 2 3 4 5 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •