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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    #1

    as in

    Hello.

    There is a couple speaking:

    - What are you doing today?
    - I'm busy tonight.
    - Doing what?
    - As in, I've got stuff to do. Busy.

    I looked up my OALD and the Internet but I have found nothing about it.
    Could you please explain what it means?

    Thanks, Alex.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • British English
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      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,627
    #2

    Re: as in

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hello.

    There is a couple speaking:

    - What are you doing today?
    - I'm busy tonight.
    - Doing what?
    - As in, I've got stuff to do. Busy.

    I looked up my OALD and the Internet but I have found nothing about it.
    Could you please explain what it means?

    Thanks, Alex.
    The person is saying something like "It's like this, I'm busy, I'm not telling you why".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 400
    #3

    Re: as in

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hello.

    There is a couple speaking:

    - What are you doing today?
    - I'm busy tonight.
    - Doing what?
    - As in, I've got stuff to do. Busy.

    I looked up my OALD and the Internet but I have found nothing about it.
    Could you please explain what it means?

    Thanks, Alex.
    Not a teacher, Nor a native
    "As in" is used to cite an example.
    I have asked a similar question in this forum before.
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...075-usage.html

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • British English
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      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,876
    #4

    Re: as in

    We sometimes follow "as in" with the definition of a word, almost as if we are suggesting that the listener simply did not understand the word we used so we try to explain it.

    - What are you doing tonight?
    - I'm busy.
    - Busy?!
    - Yes, busy. As in not free, not available, doing something else, occupied, engaged in another activity. Busy!

    - Where do you live?
    - In London.
    - Do you live in a flat?
    - No. I live in a house.
    - A house?!
    - Yes. A house. As in a building or structure, usually on more than one floor, designed for human habitation.
    - Wow. A house in London. You must be rich!
    - Rich?
    - Rich. As in not poor, having money, etc etc ...

    I think you get the picture. In the examples above, it would be used somewhat sarcastically.

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