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  1. learning54's Avatar
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    #1

    Question on 'blowing'

    Hi Teachers,
    Could 'moving rapidly' be a good explanation for 'blowing' in the following sentence?
    If not could you suggest one please?

    The wind is still blowing.

    Thanks in advance

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    #2

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    Quote Originally Posted by learning54 View Post
    Hi Teachers,
    Could 'moving rapidly' be a good explanation for 'blowing' in the following sentence?
    If not could you suggest one please?

    The wind is still blowing.

    Thanks in advance
    Not a teacher, Nor a native
    In my opinion "wind blowing " simply means wind is moving, not necessarily rapidly.
    blow - definition of blow by Macmillan Dictionary meaning 1#

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    In my opinion "wind blowing " simply means wind is moving, not necessarily rapidly.
    blow - definition of moving rapidly/strongly blow by Macmillan Dictionary meaning 1#
    I agree, to an extent. The air is not necessarily moving rapidly/strongly, but there is often a suggestion that it is. If it is not moving rapidly, we tend to say things such as: Theres' a (slight/light breeze).

  3. learning54's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    Not a teacher, Nor a native
    In my opinion "wind blowing " simply means wind is moving, not necessarily rapidly.
    blow - definition of blow by Macmillan Dictionary meaning 1#
    Hi masterding,
    Thank you for your reply and help.
    Another definition, blow (of wind), 'move creating an air current'

    Best,
    Learning
    Last edited by learning54; 31-Dec-2011 at 11:23.

  4. learning54's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I agree, to an extent. The air is not necessarily moving rapidly/strongly, but there is often a suggestion that it is. If it is not moving rapidly, we tend to say things such as: Theres' a (slight/light breeze).
    Hi sir,
    Thank for your reply. So, somehow when the air is blowing, it is moving rapidly because if it is not, it is just 'a slight/lightbreeze', as you've said.

    Best,
    Learning
    Last edited by learning54; 31-Dec-2011 at 11:28.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    Quote Originally Posted by learning54 View Post
    Thank for your reply. So, somehow when the air is blowing, it is moving rapidly because if it is not not it is just 'a slight/lightbreeze', as you've said.
    I said there is a suggestionthat it is moving rapidly.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    In my opinion, "the wind blew lightly through the trees" would also be perfectly acceptable. That uses "to blow" but does not suggest that it's fast. To me, "to blow" is simply the verb we associate with the wind, whatever the wind speed. We use some other verbs when we want to make it clear that the wind is particularly strong or violent.

    The wind whipped through the forest.
    The wind howled amongst the trees.
    The wind raged across the mountaintops.

    We also use it without the word "wind":

    It's blowing a gale out there!
    It's a bit blowy today.

    I would probably suggest that if you particularly want to suggest that the wind is not strong at all, just call it "a breeze" instead of "wind".

  7. learning54's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I said there is a suggestionthat it is moving rapidly.
    Hi sir,
    Sorry. Yes you did say 'suggestion'

    Best,
    Learning

  8. learning54's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Question on 'blowing'

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In my opinion, "the wind blew lightly through the trees" would also be perfectly acceptable. That uses "to blow" but does not suggest that it's fast. To me, "to blow" is simply the verb we associate with the wind, whatever the wind speed. We use some other verbs when we want to make it clear that the wind is particularly strong or violent.

    The wind whipped through the forest.
    The wind howled amongst the trees.
    The wind raged across the mountaintops.

    We also use it without the word "wind":

    It's blowing a gale out there!
    It's a bit blowy today.

    I would probably suggest that if you particularly want to suggest that the wind is not strong at all, just call it "a breeze" instead of "wind".
    Hi emsr2d2,
    Thank you for your reply and examples.

    Best,
    Learning

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