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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    bringing a new, talented player onto

    Isn't "into" more suitable than "onto"? or are the both proper in this context?

    ex)...In sports, for example, coaches know that bringing a new, talented player onto a team make the other player bettter..

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    #2

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Isn't "into" more suitable than "onto"? or are the both proper in this context?

    ex)...In sports, for example, coaches know that bringing a new, talented player onto a team make the other player bettter..
    Not a teacher, Nor a native.
    I think they are both correct. British use "be in a team" to describe someone is a member of the team, whereas American like to use "be on a team". So I see it as merely the difference between American English and British English. It's my opinion.let's see what teachers will say.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Into and onto are more natural to me than to. If you bring a player to a team, it suggests to me thatyou escort him in some way to meet the team.

    The sentence should end "...make the other players bettter."

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    #4

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Isn't "into" more suitable than "onto"? or are the both proper in this context?

    ex)...In sports, for example, coaches know that bringing a new, talented player onto a team make the other player bettter..
    "Into" means bringing within or bringing inside. "Onto" means on top of or over the surface of.

    There's a confusion here and a common one - much the same as "everyday" and "every day" are commonly misused.

    Because it is quite acceptable to say "bringing an experienced player on to a team". But "on to" and "onto" mean different things!

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    #5

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    Not a teacher, Nor a native.
    I think they are both correct. British use "be in a team" to describe someone is a member of the team, whereas American like to use "be on a team". So I see it as merely the difference between American English and British English. It's my opinion.let's see what teachers will say.
    As a Brit I agree.

    What you've said emphasises my point above about "on to a team" and "onto" a team! (One doesn't bring a new player on a team, it's "on to a team").

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by RobMasters View Post
    "Into" means bringing within or bringing inside. "Onto" means on top of or over the surface of. [...].

    Because it is quite acceptable to say "bringing an experienced player on to a team". But "on to" and "onto" mean different things!
    'Onto' a team' (17 COCA citations] is much more used in AmE than 'on to' (2). Neither is used in Br E (only one citation for each in BNC); 'into' (27) is the preferred preposition.

    These days many speakers of BrE write 'onto' as one word, unless they are clearly not part of the same idea:

    As the curtain rose, Madonna stepped onto the stage.
    Madonna came on to thunderous applause.

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    #7

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    'Onto' a team' (17 COCA citations] is much more used in AmE than 'on to' (2). Neither is used in Br E (only one citation for each in BNC); 'into' (27) is the preferred preposition.

    These days many speakers of BrE write 'onto' as one word, unless they are clearly not part of the same idea:

    As the curtain rose, Madonna stepped onto the stage.
    Madonna came on to thunderous applause.
    Thank you for reiterating my point. The player was brought on, not onto.

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    #8

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    'Onto' a team' (17 COCA citations] is much more used in AmE than 'on to' (2). Neither is used in Br E (only one citation for each in BNC); 'into' (27) is the preferred preposition.

    These days many speakers of BrE write 'onto' as one word, unless they are clearly not part of the same idea:

    As the curtain rose, Madonna stepped onto the stage.
    Madonna came on to thunderous applause.
    Beside the point but I have always been suspicious of statistics. Can you look up the figures relating to "me either" (meaning "me neither") or "I could care less" (meaning the opposite) and let me know how many Contemporary American English citations they attract? It might be 'contemporary" but it ain't correct usage.
    Last edited by RobMasters; 02-Jan-2012 at 15:48.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by RobMasters View Post
    Beside the point but I have always been suspicious of statistics.
    The figures one obtains from a large corpus such as COCA are a rather better guide to what is generally used than an individual's opinion.
    Can you look up the figures relating to "me either" (meaning "me neither") or "I could care less" (meaning the opposite) and let me know how many Contemporary American English citations they attract?
    Here is the site: Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA)

    It might be 'contemporary" but it ain't correct usage.
    If enough people use an expression in semi-formal situations, then who is to say that it is not 'correct'?

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: bringing a new, talented player onto

    Quote Originally Posted by RobMasters View Post
    Thank you for reiterating my point. The player was brought on, not onto.
    He may have been brought on, but he was brought onto the team - which is what the original question was about.

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