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    #1

    graduate

    Quote from VOA News:

    Meza just graduated from the university and is considering either graduate or law school. Her plans just got a little easier a few months ago, when California passed the Dream Act, a law that makes students who are not in the U.S. legally eligible for financial aid at public universities within the state.
    ...
    A Federal Dream Act failed in the Senate last year. It would have created a pathway to citizenship for qualifying illegal immigrants. Again, Kent Wong:
    “The reality is that because the majority are from Latin America and Asia there is a strong reaction from older conservative white members of Congress who fear the integration of students of color within our society,” Wong said.
    But Republican strategist, Luis Alvarado says the views of many Democrats and Republicans are not that different. He says many Republicans and Latinos prefer immigration reform to be on the national level because states such as California cannot afford to have their own immigration policy.
    All you need to do is go to LA county hospitals emergency room and find out who is actually utilizing those services there it’s a reality that there is a burden placed upon society because this issue has not been resolved. A solution is very complex; the reality is we’re not going to have a solution until we actually find out who the next president of the United States is,” Alvarado said.

    My questions:
    1.Does "graduate" mean graduation?
    2.Should "majority" be plural?
    3.Is it because of racism?
    4.I don't quite understand what's the good of doing that.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: graduate

    I can only answer the second quesiton.
    Majority is a noun, here it means most.
    Ex:The majority was/were in favour of the proposal.
    Both was and were are right in the above sentence.
    Hope it helps.

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    #3

    Re: graduate

    [QUOTE=masterding
    “[COLOR=blue]All you need to do is go to LA county hospitals emergency room and find out who is actually utilizing those services[/COLOR]
    4.I don't quite understand what's the good of doing that.


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) You have posted a SUPER controversial matter.

    (2) Since this is strictly a LANGUAGE site, all of us posters will have to be

    very careful in our answers.

    (3) Let me discuss No. 4. That sentence means something like:

    If you go to the emergency rooms of hospitals in big cities, you will see

    that many of the patients are "undocumented immigrants." That is a nice

    term for people who do not have legal permission to be here. The law in our

    country is that anyone who needs emergency medical care has a legal right

    to get emergency care even if s/he cannot pay for it. So the person who wrote

    that sentence is saying that a visit to an emergency room will show that the

    "undocumented immigrants" are costing the state a lot of money that is needed

    to care for them.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: graduate

    1. No, it's graduate school, where you can get a master's degree or PhD. We commonly just say "grad school."

    3. Yes, that is what he is implying. Please don't ask further questions on this aspect or it will become a political discussion.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: graduate

    Quote Originally Posted by dut_thinker View Post
    I can only answer the second quesiton.
    Majority is a noun, here it means most.
    Ex:The majority was/were in favour of the proposal.
    Both was and were are right in the above sentence.
    Hope it helps.
    2. I think the majority =the majority of immigrants, that's why it is followed by "are".
    But can I use " majorities" or " large majorities" to replace " the majority'?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: graduate

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    But can I use " majorities" or " large majorities" to replace " the majority'?
    No.

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    #7

    Re: graduate

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    No.
    But I see sentences like
    "Large majorities of Americans favor the broad intent of several types of abortion restriction laws that are now common in many states, but have mixed or negative reactions to others."
    "Gallup Poll Show Large Majorities in Favor of Most Pro-Life Initiatives"

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: graduate

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    But I see sentences like
    "Large majorities of Americans favor the broad intent of several types of abortion restriction laws that are now common in many states, but have mixed or negative reactions to others."
    "Gallup Poll Show Large Majorities in Favor of Most Pro-Life Initiatives"
    Supposing you have several issues with different opinions (for and against for example) on each issue, in that case you could have majorities for or against in respect of each issue. In you original text there is one majority, a majority of students.

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    #9

    Re: graduate

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Supposing you have several issues with different opinions (for and against for example) on each issue, in that case you could have majorities for or against in respect of each issue. In you original text there is one majority, a majority of students.
    But in the example sentence I quoted, only one issue was talked about, that is abortion restriction laws.

    "Large majorities of Americans favor the broad intent of several types of abortion restriction laws that are now common in many states, but have mixed or negative reactions to others."

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: graduate

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    But in the example sentence I quoted, only one issue was talked about, that is abortion restriction laws.

    "Large majorities of Americans favor the broad intent of several types of abortion restriction laws that are now common in many states, but have mixed or negative reactions to others."
    Bhai.

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