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    #1

    Cool indeed

    Hi,

    I sometimes don't get the use of indeed. When a cnn reporter says "thank you very much indeed..." It doesn't make any sense in French.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    Hi,

    I sometimes don't get the use of indeed. When a cnn reporter says "thank you very much indeed..." It doesn't make any sense in French.
    Have a look at this link: indeed adverb - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    Hi,

    I sometimes don't get the use of indeed. When a cnn reporter says "thank you very much indeed..." It doesn't make any sense in French.
    That's because he's not speaking French. If he were, he would choose a different word.
    You've posted a few threads lately ('odd', machine translations) that indicate that you think there is a word for word translatability between languages, and that if you can translate every word in a sentence, you have a good sentence in the target language.

    Is that how you think language works? It would save you a lot of puzzlement to know that it doesn't.

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    #4

    Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    Hi,

    I sometimes don't get the use of indeed. When a cnn reporter says "thank you very much indeed..." It doesn't make any sense in French.

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) May I add a few points to the moderator's very helpful link?

    (2) First, it might be worth remembering that "indeed" was originally

    two words: in + deed. (A "deed" is something like an action.)

    (3) You say that it does not make any sense in French. I do NOT know

    even a word of French, but I have a French dictionary that says that

    vraiment means truly/ in truth/ indeed/ really.

    (4) So I guess that CNN reporter wanted to say something like:

    I thank you from my heart./ Please have no doubt about the sincerity and

    depth of my gratitude.

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    #5

    Cool Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    That's because he's not speaking French. If he were, he would choose a different word.
    You've posted a few threads lately ('odd', machine translations) that indicate that you think there is a word for word translatability between languages, and that if you can translate every word in a sentence, you have a good sentence in the target language.

    Is that how you think language works? It would save you a lot of puzzlement to know that it doesn't.
    I know that a sentence can't be translated word by word. In the case of "yes indeed", it's understandable in French. The "thank you very much indeed" sounds redundant for me.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    I know that a sentence can't be translated word by word. In the case of "yes indeed", it's understandable in French. The "thank you very much indeed" sounds redundant for me.
    The other point I should have been making is that if you want to learn English, you need to get out of the habit of asking yourself whether it would make sense in French.

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    #7

    Cool Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The other point I should have been making is that if you want to learn English, you need to get out of the habit of asking yourself whether it would make sense in French.
    Easier said than done, especially when I have to translate sentences to people who do not understand a single word in English.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    I know that a sentence can't be translated word by word. In the case of "yes indeed", it's understandable in French. The "thank you very much indeed" sounds redundant for me.

    It is a little redundant, but it's like saying "Thank you much. I really mean it -- I appreciate it greatly."

    It emphasizes that the thanks are not pro forma, but are genuine.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Cool Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    I know that a sentence can't be translated word by word. In the case of "yes indeed", it's understandable in French. The "thank you very much indeed" sounds redundant for me.
    By the way: "redundant for me" or "redundant to me"?

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: indeed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    By the way: "redundant for me" or "redundant to me"?
    "sounds redundant to me" would be better. There is often a choice between "for me" and "to me", but with "sounds", it sounds to you to be redundant.

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