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  1. wotcha's Avatar
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    #1

    'with a steward in pursuit'

    Having rounded Joe Hart from a clearly offside position, Ji ran to the crowd and after being mobbed a fan came from left field, with a steward in pursuit, to put a smacker on the South Korean striker.


    This is from a news article, and I don't understand the red phrase. Isn't steward a guy's name????

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    Quote Originally Posted by wotcha View Post
    Having rounded Joe Hart from a clearly offside position, Ji ran to the crowd and after being mobbed a fan came from left field, with a steward in pursuit, to put a smacker on the South Korean striker.


    This is from a news article, and I don't understand the red phrase. Isn't steward a guy's name????
    No, "Stewart" or "Stuart" are names.

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    #3

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    Quote Originally Posted by wotcha View Post
    Having rounded Joe Hart from a clearly offside position, Ji ran to the crowd and after being mobbed a fan came from left field, with a steward in pursuit, to put a smacker on the South Korean striker.


    This is from a news article, and I don't understand the red phrase. Isn't steward a guy's name????
    More respect to you if you'd take a moment to look up "steward" in the dictionary before posting . . .

  3. wotcha's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    Quote Originally Posted by RobMasters View Post
    More respect to you if you'd take a moment to look up "steward" in the dictionary before posting . . .

    Sorry....-_-;;.. How do I not know steward and stewardess,,,

    but I still don't understand the phrase. ㅠㅜ

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    Take a look at definition 3, here: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'


  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    'You might also want to look up 'in pursuit'... and 'with' now I think of it. 'With A in B' means that A was doing whatever verb is associated with B; in this case the steward was pursuing him.

    A 'smacker' is a flamboyant kiss. (The fan wanted to show his approval.)

    b

  7. wotcha's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'You might also want to look up 'in pursuit'... and 'with' now I think of it. 'With A in B' means that A was doing whatever verb is associated with B; in this case the steward was pursuing him.

    A 'smacker' is a flamboyant kiss. (The fan wanted to show his approval.)

    b
    Thank you so much. ㅠㅠ

    and sorry for my laziness and stupidity to all...

    sometimes (or more often) my brain just doesn't work. ㅡ.ㅡ
    Last edited by wotcha; 05-Jan-2012 at 18:13.

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    Sometimes my brain doesn't either, and I'm working in my NATIVE language. No worries!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #10

    Re: 'with a steward in pursuit'

    I still don't know what a flight attendant was doing on a soccer field.

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