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    #1

    in case

    I came across this test question: 'Keep the tickets in case I ... them. A:lose B:would lose C: lost D: will lose (with A being the officially correct answer)
    Am I right in claiming that something is not right with it logically even if grammaticaly it looks fine? We cannot lose anything once this thing is handed over to somebody else. In other words conforming with the request 'keep the tickets' precludes an event (case) of the other person 'losing them'.
    If my suspicions are confirmed, how to convey the originally intended meaning?
    Would these sentences be acceptable?
    'Keep the tickets SO THAT I don't lose them'
    'Keep the tickets TO PREVENT my losing them'

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    #2

    Re: in case

    Quote Originally Posted by JarekSteliga View Post
    I came across this test question: 'Keep the tickets in case I ... them. A:lose B:would lose C: lost D: will lose (with A being the officially correct answer)
    Am I right in claiming that something is not right with it logically even if grammaticaly it looks fine? We cannot lose anything once this thing is handed over to somebody else. In other words conforming with the request 'keep the tickets' precludes an event (case) of the other person 'losing them'.
    If my suspicions are confirmed, how to convey the originally intended meaning?
    Would these sentences be acceptable?
    'Keep the tickets SO THAT I don't lose them'
    'Keep the tickets TO PREVENT my losing them'
    Good questions/analysis. Probably not uncommon to hear "lose" or "would lose"in that situation even thought the tickets have been transferred, but probably more logical if person "A". were in the process of transferring the tickets to person "B" and "the" would more likely be replaced with "these". But your alternative sentences would be the most logically and grammatically correct if the tickets had been transferred.
    Last edited by billmcd; 04-Jan-2012 at 03:55.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: in case

    I completely agree with how illogical that sentence is!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in case

    Totally illogical.

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    #5

    Re: in case

    Thank you all for the quick and unanimous reply. The publication in which the discussed sentence appeared is:
    FCE USE OF ENTLISH 1 STUTENT'S BOOK, VIRGINIA EVANS , EXPRESS PUBLISHING

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: in case

    Quote Originally Posted by JarekSteliga View Post
    Thank you all for the quick and unanimous reply. The publication in which the discussed sentence appeared is:
    FCE USE OF ENTLISH 1 STUTENT'S BOOK, VIRGINIA EVANS , EXPRESS PUBLISHING

    Are the words I've marked in red really in the title, or were they your typos?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: in case

    Having noticed myself saying to a friend a moment or two ago, "You keep the keys in case I lose them", I have to revise my view that it's not acceptable. It may appear illogical, but it works.

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    #8

    Re: in case

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Are the words I've marked in red really in the title, or were they your typos?

    I am sorry, both words were misspelt by myself.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: in case

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Having noticed myself saying to a friend a moment or two ago, "You keep the keys in case I lose them", I have to revise my view that it's not acceptable. It may appear illogical, but it works.
    Yes it's illogical, but language is not always logical. I would bet you any amount of money that that construction is widely used by native speakers.

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    #10

    Re: in case

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Having noticed myself saying to a friend a moment or two ago, "You keep the keys in case I lose them", I have to revise my view that it's not acceptable. It may appear illogical, but it works.


    ... and this rather puts paid to my ...CASE (not for the first time in this forum)


    Thank you nonetheless

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