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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
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      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 433
    #1

    do you mind ME/MY doing something?

    My dictionary instructs me to say: 'Will they mind us being late?'. Am I wrong to have a problem with this?
    I would much rather say: 'Will they mind OUR being late?'
    I could understand:
    'Will they mind US?' (meaning: 'Will they mind our presence?'
    or
    'Will they mind being late?' (meaning:'Will they mind if they arrive late?')
    however
    'us' and 'being' in my opinion do not belong together.

    • Member Info
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    #2

    Re: do you mind ME/MY doing something?

    [QUOTE=JarekSteliga;839779]


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) This question always produces a lot of pleasant and courteous disagreements

    among teachers.

    (2) This is what some teachers say:

    (a) Do you mind my marrying your daughter next month? = Is next month a good date

    for us to get married? In other words, you are putting the emphasis on the "marrying."

    (b) Do you mind me marrying your daughter? = Yes, I am poor now, but I will work hard

    and make enough money to take care of your daughter. In other words, the emphasis

    is on your acceptance of "me."

    (3) As I said, some teachers say that it doesn't matter which one you choose. They

    say that the context of the conversation will make clear exactly what the meaning is.

    P.S. I love the "rule." I hope that you follow it, too.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 433
    #3

    Re: do you mind ME/MY doing something?

    [QUOTE=TheParser;839791]
    Quote Originally Posted by JarekSteliga View Post


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) This question always produces a lot of pleasant and courteous disagreements

    among teachers.

    (2) This is what some teachers say:

    (a) Do you mind my marrying your daughter next month? = Is next month a good date

    for us to get married? In other words, you are putting the emphasis on the "marrying."

    (b) Do you mind me marrying your daughter? = Yes, I am poor now, but I will work hard

    and make enough money to take care of your daughter. In other words, the emphasis

    is on your acceptance of "me."

    (3) As I said, some teachers say that it doesn't matter which one you choose. They

    say that the context of the conversation will make clear exactly what the meaning is.

    P.S. I love the "rule." I hope that you follow it, too.
    Many thanks for this comment.
    Makes me realize how I overlooked the issues related to the 'distribution' of emphasis.
    I am working my way through a pile of English language tests. I will reactivate this thread once I stumble upon a question revolving around the topic under discussion to show which side of 'pleasant and corteous disagreement' the author of this particular test subscribes to

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