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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    a fish => two fish

    This might be a useless question, but why do you think the following nouns' plural forms are same as the singular forms in terms of same species?

    ex)a fish => two fish
    a deer => two deer

  2. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a fish => two fish

    (Not a Teacher)

    Because "fishes" and "deers" sound weird to native speakers?

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    #3

    Re: a fish => two fish

    I believe many of these uninflected plurals, particularly those involving animals, survive from Old English… e.g. deer, fowl, fish, sheep etc. But "fishes", "fowls" and other examples are not uncommon in certain contexts.

    not a teacher

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a fish => two fish

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    I believe many of these uninflected plurals, particularly those involving animals, survive from Old English… e.g. deer, fowl, fish, sheep etc. But "fishes", "fowls" and other examples are not uncommon in certain contexts.

    not a teacher
    Do you happen to know why they used the same form both in plural and singular in old English?

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    #5

    Re: a fish => two fish

    Do you happen to know why they used the same form both in plural and singular in old English?

    Sorry Keannu, I'm getting a little out of my depth there but maybe one of the genuine teachers can shed some light on this.

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