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    #1

    Doubts

    Help me please.........
    What is the difference between the following sentences
    I have not taken my food
    I did not take my food

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Doubts

    Welcome to the forum, Saiju Thomas.

    Neither sentence is natural. We'd probably say: I have not eaten anything/ I did not eat anything.

    Do you understand the difference between the present perfect and the past tense?

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    #3

    Re: Doubts

    Quote Originally Posted by Saiju Thomas View Post
    I did not take my food

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I have noticed that many English learners here in the United States say

    something like: It's time for me to take my lunch.

    (2) As the moderator reminded us, the verbs preferred by native speakers

    are "have" or "eat."




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    #4

    Re: Doubts

    [not a teacher]

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (1) I have noticed that many English learners here in the United States say

    something like: It's time for me to take my lunch.
    The verb "to take" in this context refers to taking a lunch break. A worker or supervisor might command, "Hey people, let's take lunch".

    Also, it is fine to say "take food" if the meaning is not "to ingest", but simply "to move". Someone accused of stealing might reply, "I did not take your food!" This sentense would never mean "I didn't eat your food."

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