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    #1

    neckscarf

    Does neckscarf mean both in thin and thick material (for winter)?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: neckscarf

    Does neckscarf mean both in thin and thick material (for winter)?

    A scarf can be of any suitable material from, for example, fine silk to the heaviest wool.

    not a teacher

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    #3

    Re: neckscarf

    The word neckscarf is listed in only the Urban Dictionary, which makes it non-standard.

    Stick to scarf or headscarf.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: neckscarf

    As two words, it appears a lot: neck scarf. Here's the page of Google results. I would only use it to describe the more decorative, thinner type of scarf which is tied in a bow or decorative way at the neck, much like the ones worn by many air hostesses as part of their uniform.

    For a longer, warmer version to wear in winter, I would use just "scarf", and for the type worn by the Queen, a "headscarf".

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