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  1. faryan's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation 'like and 'unlike' as propositions

    Hi
    According to the rule that the words 'like and 'unlike' can function as propositions, would you please explain it more through some examples?

    And in the example below they are adjectives, aren't they?
    'Particles with unlike changes attract each other, while particles with like charges repel each other.'
    Thanks in advance

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    #2

    Re: 'like and 'unlike' as propositions

    Quote Originally Posted by faryan View Post
    Hi
    According to the rule that the words 'like and 'unlike' can function as propositions, would you please explain it more through some examples?

    And in the example below they are adjectives, aren't they?
    'Particles with unlike changes attract each other, while particles with like charges repel each other.'
    Thanks in advance
    The word is "preposition", not "proposition". "Proposition" means something else.

    In your example, the words are adjectives.

    For examples of sentences in which these words are used as prepositions, see

    like - definition of like by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    unlike - definition of unlike by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

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    #3

    Re: 'like and 'unlike' as propositions

    [QUOTE=faryan;841598]Hi
    According to the rule that the words 'like and 'unlike' can function as propositions


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) According to some super strict teachers (of whom only a few still survive in 2012),

    "like" is only an adjective/adverb. Not a preposition.

    (2) For example:

    He looks like his cousin.

    He = subject.

    looks = linking verb.

    like = adjective.

    unto = "understood preposition."

    his cousin = object of "unto."

    (3) Today, however, most teachers would probably disagree with this analysis.

    So in order to make your teachers happy, you have to smile and agree with what

    they say. That's life!

    Source: Professors Homer House and Susan Harman, Descriptive English

    Grammar, copyright in 1931 and 1950.

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    #4

    Re: 'like and 'unlike' as propositions

    Faryan, TheParser has given you a a bit of historical information about the word "like". Please note that very few people or nobody would say

    He looks like unto his cousin.


    in an everyday conversation nowadays. It's an archaic construction. It might even turn out difficult to understand for some.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 08-Jan-2012 at 21:02.

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