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    #1

    degrees of comparison

    My task was to write the initial form of adjectives "More lighter" and "Best higher".

    Well, you know, like the initial form of "better" is "good".

    But here, I can't understand, can they be used, such phrases "more lighter" and "best higher"? And if such phrases REALLY EXIST, may be their initial forms are "much light" and "good high"?

    I',m confused. May be it is just a typing mistake. And there are just 4 words instead of 2 phrases?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: degrees of comparison

    Quote Originally Posted by marin123 View Post
    My task was to write the initial form of adjectives "More lighter" and "Best higher".

    Well, you know, like the initial form of "better" is "good".

    But here, I can't understand, can they be used, such phrases "more lighter" and "best higher"? And if such phrases REALLY EXIST, may be their initial forms are "much light" and "good high"?

    I',m confused. May be it is just a typing mistake. And there are just 4 words instead of 2 phrases?
    "More lighter" and "best higher" aren't used in natural English. I think you're probably right that they want you to find the initial form of:

    1 - more
    2 - lighter
    3 - best
    4 - higher

    However, given the example you gave (initial form of "better" is "good") then I'm not sure what they expect you to do with #1 and #3.

    As a side thought, I can think of one example where "best" and "higher" would appear next to each other but not as a two-word phrase.

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    #3

    Re: degrees of comparison

    I also believe that there can't be such phrases at all. That's why I'm asking.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: degrees of comparison

    I think you need to go back to whoever gave you this task, and ask them for clarification. If they say that "more lighter" and "best higher" are acceptable English phrases, you can tell them that is incorrect (or at least that this native speaker believes that it's incorrect!)

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    #5

    Re: degrees of comparison

    [QUOTE=marin123;841718]


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) As the teacher told us, the so-called "double comparative" and the so-called

    "double superlative" are NOT considered "good" English in 2012.

    (2) I have read that they were OK back in the days of Shakespeare (more than

    400 years ago). But today we do NOT say:

    Tom is more taller than Joe.

    This is the most best website on the Web.

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    #6

    Re: degrees of comparison

    Thank you very much for your help.
    These phrases must be just a mistake, and there are separate words, not phrases.

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