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    #1

    get out of/from

    With get out is it used of or from? For instance:

    'Get out of my room' or 'Get out from my room' ?

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: get out of/from

    Most commonly 'of' - so 'Get out of my room'. But sometimes a 'from' just happens to follow 'out' - so you could have, say, 'He wanted to get out from under her thumb'.

    b

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    #3

    Re: get out of/from

    I think the phrase 'out of' itself means 'from'. If this is true, then, I think, 'from' is repetitive.
    Get 'out of' my room means get(away) 'from'...So,I'd rather say get out of my room or move away from...

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    #4

    Re: get out of/from

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Most commonly 'of' - so 'Get out of my room'. But sometimes a 'from' just happens to follow 'out' - so you could have, say, 'He wanted to get out from under her thumb'.

    b


    I think get 'out from' can be used if the speaker is not in the same place as the addressee

    Jane:(on phone)hello mon, I think my roof is cracking.
    Mom:Omg! What are you still doing, get out from there!

    He got out from the plane and started shouting.
    It's over between us,get out of my life.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: get out of/from

    Quote Originally Posted by rhapsomatrics View Post
    I think get 'out from' can be used if the speaker is not in the same place as the addressee

    Jane:(on phone)hello mon, I think my roof is cracking.
    Mom:Omg! What are you still doing, get out from there! "Get out of there!" would be more natural.

    He got out from the plane and started shouting. "He got out of the plane..." would be more usual.
    It's over between us,get out of my life.
    Bhai.

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    #6

    Re: get out of/from

    "more natural", "more usual" .I think these expressions are a bit evasive and somewhat implicit. If you have something more academically authoritative please be kind enough to share with us. I want to learn.
    Honestly, I do not think he got out of the plane sounds right. I got out of the plane is 'fine' but 'he'?
    Do we conclude that 'get out from',though not particularly wrong,is a bit unconventional?

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: get out of/from

    Quote Originally Posted by rhapsomatrics View Post
    "more natural", "more usual" .I think these expressions are a bit evasive and somewhat implicit. If you have something more academically authoritative please be kind enough to share with us. I want to learn.
    Honestly, I do not think he got out of the plane sounds right. I got out of the plane is 'fine' but 'he'?
    Do we conclude that 'get out from',though not particularly wrong,is a bit unconventional?
    I said "more natural" and "more usual" because that is what I meant. There is no grammatical rule which applies.

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    #8

    Re: get out of/from

    Quote Originally Posted by rhapsomatrics View Post
    Do we conclude that 'get out from',though not particularly wrong,is a bit very unconventional?
    [not a teacher]

    Yes. In fact, if I heard "He got out from the plane." I would assume that I misheard that speaker, and they really said, "He got out from under the plane."

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