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    #1

    +ing

    Hello,

    Could you please correct whether it is ok or not what I wrote below?

    I can do everything for you to leave here. (It is ok)

    But,

    -I can do everthing for your leaving here.

    Do they have the same meaning grammatically?
    Last edited by ridvann; 10-Jan-2012 at 11:17.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: +ing

    Quote Originally Posted by ridvann View Post
    Hello,

    Could you please correct whether it is ok or not what I wrote below?

    I can do everything for you to leave here. (It is ok)

    But,

    -I can do everthing for your leaving here.

    Do they have the same meaning grammatically?
    I don't know what you want to say with either sentence. Do you mean "I can make all the arrangements so that you can leave"?

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    #3

    Re: +ing

    Is it time for you to move to cash?

    Is it time for your moving to cash?

    I would like to ask whether both of them have the same meaning or not.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: +ing

    Quote Originally Posted by ridvann View Post
    Is it time for you to move to cash?

    Is it time for your moving to cash?

    I would like to ask whether both of them have the same meaning or not.

    This has nothing to do with your original question. Please deal with the first question before moving on to another query (which will need to be put in a separate thread anyway). Thanks.

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    #5

    Re: +ing

    Thanks...I just want to know what will happen if we get rif of 'to' ,and if we put '+ing' ,and put 'your' instead of 'you'.

    For example: Is it time for you to move to cash? vs Is it time for your moving to cash?

    I just want to ask whether the second sentence is grammatically correct or not.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: +ing

    Quote Originally Posted by ridvann View Post
    Thanks...I just want to know what will happen if we get rif of 'to' ,and if we put '+ing' ,and put 'your' instead of 'you'.

    For example: Is it time for you to move to cash? vs Is it time for your moving to cash?

    I just want to ask whether the second sentence is grammatically correct or not.
    It's not.

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    #7

    Re: +ing

    Thanks for the answer, but I couldn't find the meaining of ' Is it time for your moving to cash?'. The first one is used, that is ok.

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    #8

    Re: +ing

    Quote Originally Posted by ridvann View Post
    Thanks for the answer, but I couldn't find the meaining of ' Is it time for your moving to cash?'. The first one is used, that is ok.
    You can't find the meaning for it because it's not grammatically correct. That is what I said in my last reply. You asked if that sentence was grammatically correct and I said "It's not".

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