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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    question

    I have this sentence, it is for a song.

    "bring the night (on)
    Once gone, we wish there was more"

    Question is, do I need the "on" or without it still makes sense?
    Thank you.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: question

    Do not try to make sense of song lyrics.

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    #3

    Re: question

    haha, ok! but if you still wanted to make sense?? Forget it is for a song.

    Thank you.

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    #4

    Re: question

    Quote Originally Posted by superesti View Post
    haha, ok! but if you still wanted to make sense?? Forget it is for a song.
    One can't.

    In sentences such as those below, 'on' is necessary:

    Bring on the dancing girls.
    Bring the dancing girls on.

    On
    = on to the stage.

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: question

    Thanks for the answer. I understood the examples you gave. I heard a lot of times expressions like "bring it on" what I understand it means like "give it to me" or "bring it now", right? ; so if you say "bring the night" I guess if thereīs no "on" where you can put that "night", you donīt actually need to use it? Is that what tried to say with the examples?

    Thanx

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    #6

    Re: question

    "Bring it on" is an idiom that is used often in the USA.

    One pollitcal candidate was recently quoted as saying, "Bring it on" to his opponent. There it meant "let the competiton begin.' It is a challenge.

    'Bring something on" can also mean "let it be'

    "Bring on the night' would mean 'let there be the nighttime.'

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