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    #1

    Idioms!

    Hi, people! I'm upper intermediate Headway learner and a couple of days ago I came across one interesting sentence from the book The bling assassin and I was wondering if someone could explain me if this sentence (finish part) is writtten idiomatically: They had said Laura had turned the car sharply and deliberately and had plunged of the bridge "with no more fuss than stepping of a curb". If it is idiom, please someone to explain me.

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    #2

    Re: Idioms!

    It's a decription of the way others see this act.

    Laura's actions with the car were just like the actions she would take to step off a curb. Perhaps they were describing her act as deliberate or planned . . or . . . it could have been accidently, without thought. The context will give you a hint.

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    #3

    Re: Idioms!

    Quote Originally Posted by nikolina View Post
    Hi, people! I'm upper intermediate Headway learner and a couple of days ago I came across one an interesting sentence from the book "The Bling Assassin" and I was wondering if someone could explain to me if this sentence (finish the part at the end) is writtten idiomatically: They had It said Laura had turned the car sharply and deliberately and had plunged of the bridge "with no more fuss than stepping off a curb". If it is an idiom, please someone to explain me can someone explain it to me, please.
    I would say that it sounds as if she drove her car in that way and then drove it off a bridge in a rather casual manner, as if it was nothing out of the ordinary. Stepping off the curb is something that you would not think was at all unusual, so you would not expect someone to do something as dangerous and wild as driving off a bridge with the same nonchalance as driving off a curb.

    Please also see my amendments to your post above in red. Always remember that we say "explain to me".

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    #4

    Re: Idioms!

    Thank you! And, excuse my mistakes, I was in a rush while I was writing it. And (the second comment) I thought so, like something usual and ordinary. The book is actually named: "The Blind Assassin", written by Margaret Atwood. But, there is also an interesting your point of view. Namely, the writer was the one who wrote : "They had said Laura had turned the car ..." And what would be the specific difference between "had said" and "They had it said Laura". Thank you in advance!

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    #5

    Re: Idioms!

    Quote Originally Posted by nikolina View Post
    Thank you! And, excuse my mistakes, I was in a rush while I was writing it. And (the second comment) I thought so, like something usual and ordinary. The book is actually named: "The Blind Assassin", written by Margaret Atwood. But, there is also an interesting your point of view. Namely, the writer was the one who wrote : "They had said Laura had turned the car ..." And what would be the specific difference between "had said" and "They had it said Laura". Thank you in advance!
    Apologies. I didn't realise that the actual quote started with the words "They had said ..." as you did not put that in quotes. I thought that you meant "The words in the book said ..." but you had written "They had said ..."

    If that hadn't been part of the quote, then we would use "It said ..." followed by the quote.

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