Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #1

    that good and bad boy

    That good and bad boy is his brother.

    I read this sentence in a grammar book. The book says that the phrase 'good and' in this sentence means 'very'. Do native speakers use 'good and' to intensify words like 'bad' (which has a negative meaning)?

    Thank you in advance.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #2

    Re: that good and bad boy

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    That good and bad boy is his brother.

    I read this sentence in a grammar book. The book says that the phrase 'good and' in this sentence means 'very'. Do native speakers use 'good and' to intensify words like 'bad' (which has a negative meaning)?

    Thank you in advance.
    We do, but using it before "bad" is likely to cause a lot of confusion! In your example I immediately thought that the boy was being described as both good and bad (ie well-behaved and badly behaved).

    However, we do use it colloquially to mean "very".

    Make sure the food is good and hot before you serve it.
    Ensure the knot is good and tight before taking your finger away.

    We don't use it before every adjective though. I don't think I would say, for example:

    Draw the picture good and small.
    Build the house good and large.

  2. JohnParis's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Oct 2011
    • Posts: 773
    #3

    Re: that good and bad boy

    No, I have never heard this.
    In certain circumstances (mostly highly informal slang) saying that something is "bad" actually means that it is "good."
    In certain circles, for example, the phrase "that dude is bad" means "that guy is really good." This sort of inversion exists in several languages I am familiar with.

    Edit: After reading emsr2d2's post I realized that I did not understand the question. Please excuse me.
    Last edited by JohnParis; 17-Jan-2012 at 13:28. Reason: error in comprehension

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #4

    Re: that good and bad boy

    On the basis of JohnParis' reply, I think we've found another BrE vs AmE difference.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2012
    • Posts: 902
    #5

    Re: that good and bad boy

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    On the basis of JohnParis' reply, I think we've found another BrE vs AmE difference.
    [not a teacher]

    "good and ..." as "very" is common in AmE. I can imagine hearing this and not even notice - "Make sure the food is good and hot before you serve it."

    That good and bad boy is his brother. I read this sentence in a grammar book. The book says that the phrase 'good and' in this sentence means 'very'.
    I would throw this book out.
    Last edited by BobSmith; 17-Jan-2012 at 15:14.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] every student is a good boy
    By palinkasocsi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-May-2010, 16:38
  2. bad fiorm/ good condition. bad state - and people
    By magdalena in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Nov-2009, 19:11
  3. [Essay] The Bad Boy of Chinatown
    By GsPoT in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14-Dec-2008, 20:40
  4. be local boy made good
    By Bushwhacker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Jan-2008, 20:36
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Dec-2007, 03:32

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •