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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    inversion for adverb phrase

    When inversion happens with adverb phrase, 1 and 3 has the form of verb+subject, but 2 has subject+verb. Is it because "he" is a pronoun? or isn't there any fixed rule for inversion?

    1. My cell phone was under the table.
    -> Under the table was my cell phone.
    2. He stood at the door
    -> At the door he stood.
    3. A helicoptor passed right over our heads.
    -> Right over our heads passed a helicoptor.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    When inversion happens with adverb phrase, 1 and 3 has the form of verb+subject, but 2 has subject+verb. Is it because "he" is a pronoun? or isn't there any fixed rule for inversion?

    1. My cell phone was under the table.
    -> Under the table was my cell phone.
    2. He stood at the door
    -> At the door he stood.
    3. A helicoptor passed right over our heads.
    -> Right over our heads passed a helicopter.
    "2. He stood at the door
    -> At the door he stood." Why not "At the door stood he"? Mind you, neither version is very likely in everyday English.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    You mean these are all possible.
    Under the table was my cell phone => Under the table my cell phone was
    Right over our heads passed a helicopter.=> Right over our heads a helicopter passed

    Then, what's the difference between the two? I think the purpose of inversion is to emphasize what comes first, isn't it?
    At the door he stood.: emphasizing he?
    At the door stood.he : emphsizing stood?

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    #4

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    You mean these are all possible. ...

    Yes, though in each case, I would reverse those phrases, i.e. "A helicopter passed right over our heads." Though, I understand this is not your original question.

    Then, what's the difference between the two? I think the purpose of inversion is to emphasize what comes first, isn't it?
    At the door he stood.: emphasizing he?
    At the door stood.he : emphsizing stood?

    Actually, you have this backwards, IMO

    [not a teacher]

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Y
    Then, what's the difference between the two? I think the purpose of inversion is to emphasize what comes first, isn't it?
    At the door he stood.: emphasizing he?
    At the door stood.he : emphsizing stood?
    I agree with Bob Smith that you have that back-to-front.

    "At the door he stood" emphasises what he was doing.
    What did he do at the door?
    He stood.
    At the door he stood.

    "At the door stood he" emphasises who.
    Who stood at the door?
    He did.
    At the door stood he.

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    #6

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    [not a teacher]
    According to PEU by Micheal Swan
    1- If the subject is a noun.
    - A girl stood at the door.-------> At the door stood a girl.(not At the door a girl stood. )

    2-If the subject is a pronoun.
    - He stood at the door.--------> At the door he stood .(not At the door stood he.)

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    At the door stood he.
    That sounds most unnatural to me.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    That sounds most unnatural to me.
    Me too!

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Me too!
    Yes, I agree.

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: inversion for adverb phrase

    It sounds like it is part of a nursery rhyme.

    A little gray mouse came to my door
    And right at the door stood he.
    And he looked, and he looked, and he looked at me.
    At me and my kitty cats three.

    I mean, I just made that up, but it has that feel to it, doesn't it?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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