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    #1

    ironic

    Do these mean exactly the same thing?

    It's ironic that he has become widely known because of that accident.
    It's ironic for him to have become widely known because of that accident.

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    #2

    Re: ironic

    Yes, but the first sounds more natural to me.

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    #3

    Re: ironic

    To me too. Actually, I haven't personally seen the second usage of 'ironic'. But the book I have says it's possible, so I asked the question.

    Thanks, tdol!

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