Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #1

    This river is deepest here.

    When you compare within one same thing or person, do you always omit "the" for the superlative? Is it strict? If so, what do you think is the reason?

    1. I'm most comfortable when I'm alone -Not "the most comfortable"
    2. This river is deepest here.- Not "the deepest"
    Last edited by keannu; 21-Jan-2012 at 16:55.

  2. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #2

    Re: This river is deepest here.


    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,888
    #3

    Re: This river is deepest here.

    The deepest part of the river is here.

  3. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #4

    Re: This river is deepest here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    The deepest part of the river is here.
    You mean both forms are possible? But the first form is descriptive in the complement part. I mean if "This river is the deepest here" is impossible, making the strict rule. My grammar book defines like that, so I doubt if it's strict.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 2,013
    #5

    Re: This river is deepest here.

    If you are comparing rivers you might say: "Of the many that we have crossed today, this river is the deepest". "Of all those we have crossed, this is the deepest river".

    If you are talking about a single river: "The boat sunk here where the river is deepest", "The river is deepest here, where the boat sunk".
    Often: "The river is at its deepest here".

    But, as Tdol says: "The deepest part of the river is here".
    or...
    "The river is (at its) widest where it flows around this bend".
    "This bend is the widest part of the river".

    not a teacher

  4. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #6

    Re: This river is deepest here.

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    If you are comparing rivers you might say: "Of the many that we have crossed today, this river is the deepest". "Of all those we have crossed, this is the deepest river".

    If you are talking about a single river: "The boat sunk here where the river is deepest", "The river is deepest here, where the boat sunk".
    Often: "The river is at its deepest here".

    But, as Tdol says: "The deepest part of the river is here".
    or...
    "The river is (at its) widest where it flows around this bend".
    "This bend is the widest part of the river".

    not a teacher
    Thanks a lot, it may be bugging, but why do you think you can omit "the" for a single object? Is it because there is no other comparing objects, so the meaning of specific or unique "the" disappears? It's my guess, sorry it's because I need to explain the reason to my students.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #7

    Re: This river is deepest here.

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    If you are comparing rivers you might say: "Of the many that we have crossed today, this river is the deepest". "Of all those we have crossed, this is the deepest river".

    If you are talking about a single river: "The boat sunk here where the river is deepest", "The river is deepest here, where the boat sunk".
    Often: "The river is at its deepest here".

    But, as Tdol says: "The deepest part of the river is here".
    or...
    "The river is (at its) widest where it flows around this bend".
    "This bend is the widest part of the river".

    not a teacher
    Yes, but the reason for the sudden inclusion of "the" is that you've changed the comparison from the river to its parts. You are no longer - as keannu says -- "comparing within one same thing or person".
    A river has many parts, so one part has to be the deepest.
    There is only one river, so it has to be deepest somewhere.

Similar Threads

  1. steepest or deepest
    By vectra in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2010, 20:44
  2. [General] of the deepest dye
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2010, 09:55
  3. [General] wash into the river/be washed into the river
    By jiamajia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 30-Jul-2010, 14:34
  4. deepest province
    By palinkasocsi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Aug-2009, 22:27
  5. [General] River
    By nay nay in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Dec-2008, 22:18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •