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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #1

    The flight made it in on time

    Hello.

    I have this sentence meaning that the flight arrived in New York on time.
    Could you please explain why made go together with in?
    Is it because of the plane landing in New York?

    Also, I would be grateful if you would check grammar in this post.

    Thanks, Alex.

  2. shannico's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The flight made it in on time

    To my understanding

    The flight made it on time (with regard to its estimated time of arrival).

    The flight made it to New York in time (for Karen to make her connection to Auckland) - in time with regard to another event.

    Hope it helps
    Last edited by shannico; 29-Jan-2012 at 16:20. Reason: added "hope it helps"

  3. shannico's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The flight made it in on time

    I misread your post!! Sorry!!!
    Yes I agree there. I think it means

    The flight landed (in New York airport) on time.

    Apologies for previous post...

  4. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The flight made it in on time

    Thanks, for both of your replies.
    It is all right. You have nothing to apologize for.
    Moreover I find your first answer useful to me.
    You write The flight made it on time so I guess either you miss in or it can be omitted? Right?
    Having said that we have come to where we started from. Sorry
    Last edited by AlexAD; 29-Jan-2012 at 16:37.

  5. shannico's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The flight made it in on time

    Yes I think you can omit it if the context is clear.
    In and out refer more to the flight being on time in relation to its estimated time of arrival or departure.
    e.g.
    The flight made it out on time (took off/departed on time)
    The flight made it in on time (landed/arrived).

    Hope it helps...

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