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    #1

    Question Aren't they the same "into / in to"

    From the Cambridge Online dictionary:

    Shall we nip in to the cafe for a bite to eat?

    Can the in and to be joined together?

    Are there cases where 'in to' is different from 'into'?

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: Aren't they the same "into / in to"

    In your example there is no real difference between 'in to' and 'into', though only 'in to' is possible in "Let's nip in to get a bite to eat".

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    #3

    Re: Aren't they the same "into / in to"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tedwonny View Post

    Are there cases where 'in to' is different from 'into'?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Tedwonny,

    (1) Do not feel bad. Many native speakers (including the one who is writing this post) are also confused. YES, there is a big difference between "in to" and
    "into."

    (2) I most respectfully suggest that you keep a notebook with examples from articles that you read in English. Little by little, you will start to notice the difference.

    (3) Here is a famous example used by many teachers:

    (a) The man took his wife in to dinner.

    (b) The man took his wife into dinner.

    (3a) = He accompanied (walked with) his wife to dinner in the dining room.

    (3b) = He pushed his wife so that her head made contact with the food!!!

    (4) Here is a good explanation from Woe Is I by Ms. Patricia T. O'Conner, who used

    to work for The New York Times.

    Use into for (a) entering something, (b) changing the form of something, and (c) making contact with something.

    Ms. O'Conner's example sentence: Get into the coach before it turns into a pumpkin,

    and don't bang into the door!

    Use in for most other situations: I tune in to my favorite TV show.

    (5) Here's an example from the newspaper:

    (a) He turned himself in to the police. (He surrendered himself to the police.)
    (If you said, "He turned himself into the police," that would mean he was able to take on the form of a policeman!)

    (6) As I said, even native speakers get confused. I have seen "You must check in to the hotel" and "You must check into the hotel." (P.S. I think -- think -- that most
    people would prefer "into.")

    When you read English, and you are confused by the use of "in" or "into," just ask here. Someone will answer you.
    Last edited by TheParser; 04-Feb-2012 at 22:40.

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    #4

    Question Re: Aren't they the same "into / in to"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Tedwonny,

    (1) Do not feel bad. Many native speakers (including the one who is writing this post) are also confused. YES, there is a big difference between "in to" and
    "into."

    (2) I most respectfully suggest that you keep a notebook with examples from articles that you read in English. Little by little, you will start to notice the difference.

    (3) Here is a famous example used by many teachers:

    (a) The man took his wife in to dinner.

    (b) The man took his wife into dinner.

    (3a) = He accompanied (walked with) his wife to dinner in the dining room.

    (3b) = He pushed his wife so that her head made contact with the food!!!

    (4) Here is a good explanation from Woe Is I by Ms. Patricia T. O'Conner, who used

    to work for The New York Times.

    Use into for (a) entering something, (b) changing the form of something, and (c) making contact with something.

    Ms. O'Conner's example sentence: Get into the coach before it turns into a pumpkin,

    and don't bang into the door!

    Use in for most other situations: I tune in to my favorite TV show.

    (5) Here's an example from the newspaper:

    (a) He turned himself in to the police. (He surrendered himself to the police.)
    (If you said, "He turned himself into the police," that would mean he was able to take on the form of a policeman!)

    (6) As I said, even native speakers get confused. I have seen "You must check in to the hotel" and "You must check into the hotel." (P.S. I think -- think -- that most
    people would prefer "into.")

    When you read English, and you are confused by the use of "in" or "into," just ask here. Someone will answer you.
    Oh, please, you're too polite =]

    Thank you very much indeed!

    That's very enlightening indeed!

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