Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. AlexAD's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    #1

    Bazaar

    Hello.

    The OALD says that a bazaar is

    1. (in some Eastern countries) a street or an area of a town where there are many small shops

    2. (in Britain, the US, etc.) a sale of goods, often items made by hand, to raise money for a charity or for people who need help.

    When I was in South Africa I visited a place where there were a lot of people selling different things. Those things were hand made figures of animals made from wood, vuvuzelas, badges, drums, animal's skins and so forth. Was that what they call a bazaar?

    In the UK, the US and Europe there are usually many people trading in special places just before Christmas. Is that a bazaar? (A Christmas bazaar?)

    Thanks, Alex.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: Bazaar

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    In the UK, the US and Europe there are usually many people trading in special places just before Christmas. Is that a bazaar? (A Christmas bazaar?)
    It's usually a Chrstmas market or Christmas fair in England.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: Bazaar

    And those things the OP mentioned sound like plain 'markets'. I think usage 2 (OALDCE) is now rare in Br English. A 'bazaar' was usually in support of a charity - typical collocations used to be 'church bazaar' or 'school bazaar'. But I haven't heard either since I was a scxhoolboy.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #4

    Re: Bazaar

    My church used to have a "bazaar" every summer. Now they refer to it as a "festival."

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,830
    #5

    Re: Bazaar

    I feel the same as the previous respondents. The word was fairly common in the 70s and 80s to describe the kind of market you mention but it's not really used in the same way now.

    Christmas Market
    Christmas Fair
    Christmas Fayre (if they are trying to make it sound like an old fashioned, almost Dickensian, event)
    Church Fete (this is usually a few stands selling homemade cakes, jam etc and perhaps some live music and a raffle)

    To me, now, a bazaar is something you would have to go to certain other countries to find (for example, some North African countries, Egypt, and others).

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: Bazaar

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Church Fete (this is usually a few stands selling homemade cakes, jam etc and perhaps some live music and a raffle)
    The music is live in that it is not recorded. That's usually all you can say about it. As for the musicians, ...

  6. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #7

    Re: Bazaar

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    The music is live in that it is not recorded. That's usually all you can say about it. As for the musicians, ...
    You obviously missed my childrens' music centre 'Garden Party' - they called it that, but 'Car Park' would have been nearer the mark. There were 100s of musicians, all pretty vital - a few of them extremely good.

    b

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •