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    #1

    (Science grammar)

    Does "two-way" refer to "(effect of) stimulus" and "(effect of) time"?

    What does "with" mean there?

    Context:


    To assess the recovery of fear, we used a two-way ANOVA with main effects of stimulus(CSa1,CSb1 and CS2) and time (early and late phase of re-extinction, defined by the mean first four responses versus the last four, respectively), which revealed a stimulus 3 time interaction(F2,51=55.14,P <0.01).

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: (Science grammar)

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    Does "two-way" refer to "(effect of) stimulus" and "(effect of) time"?

    What does "with" mean there?

    Context:


    To assess the recovery of fear, we used a two-way ANOVA with main effects of stimulus(CSa1,CSb1 and CS2) and time (early and late phase of re-extinction, defined by the mean first four responses versus the last four, respectively), which revealed a stimulus 3 time interaction(F2,51=55.14,P <0.01).
    "To assess the recovery of fear" makes no sense to me.

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    #3

    Re: (Science grammar)


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    #4

    Re: (Science grammar)

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I can't find 'recovery of fear' on that page, though I imagine one could find it somewhere nearby. Perhaps it's used - wrongly - to mean 'recovery from fear' an easy slip to make, particularly if the user's L1 used de or di (which in may contexts can have the sense 'of').

    b

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    #5

    Re: (Science grammar)

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "To assess the recovery of fear" makes no sense to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I can't find 'recovery of fear' on that page, though I imagine one could find it somewhere nearby. Perhaps it's used - wrongly - to mean 'recovery from fear' an easy slip to make, particularly if the user's L1 used de or di (which in may contexts can have the sense 'of').

    b
    "The recoery of fear" is correct. Please notice that I've particularly emphasized "Science" in the title. In the study (Preventing the return of fear in humans using reconsolidation update mechanisms), researchers had to test the data of "the recovery of fear," pharmaceutically or nonpharmaceutically.

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    #6

    Re: (Science grammar)

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    Does "two-way" refer to "(effect of) stimulus" and "(effect of) time"?

    What does "with" mean there?

    Context:


    To assess the recovery of fear, we used a two-way ANOVA with main effects of stimulus(CSa1,CSb1 and CS2) and time (early and late phase of re-extinction, defined by the mean first four responses versus the last four, respectively), which revealed a stimulus 3 time interaction(F2,51=55.14,P <0.01).
    DISCLAIMER: NOT a Statistician

    Without reading the whole article its hard to be sure, and even if I did have access to it, I don't think I can spend the time to read it. Although I did take a couple of courses in Psychology a long time ago, its a distant memory now.

    Anyway, judging by the short section you have there, it looks like the two-way ANOVA (as a statistical tool) is being used to assess "recovery of fear" within the various groups of data. It looks like you are right: effects of stimulus vs. time

    Time1 Time2 Time 3
    S1
    S2
    S3

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: (Science grammar)

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    "The recoery of fear" is correct. Please notice that I've particularly emphasized "Science" in the title. In the study (Preventing the return of fear in humans using reconsolidation update mechanisms), researchers had to test the data of "the recovery of fear," pharmaceutically or nonpharmaceutically.
    Excuse me. It's my language. 'Recovery of fear' makes very little sense in anyone's language, however scientific it may be. I am tired of people using 'scientific' to mean 'illiterate' or 'uneducated'. Scienttists, as a rule, aren't.

    Perhaps this ANOVA thing is about the ability to recover the propensity to feel the emotion (fear); in that case it would be clearer to say so.

    b

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    #8

    Re: (Science grammar)

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Excuse me. It's my language. 'Recovery of fear' makes very little sense in anyone's language, however scientific it may be. I am tired of people using 'scientific' to mean 'illiterate' or 'uneducated'. Scienttists, as a rule, aren't.

    Perhaps this ANOVA thing is about the ability to recover the propensity to feel the emotion (fear); in that case it would be clearer to say so.

    b
    ANOVA means "analysis of variance". It's a statistical test. It has absolutely nothing to do with whatever the phenomenon being studied is - here, ostensibly, "recovery of fear".

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    #9

    Re: (Science grammar)

    Does the test test certain variables to do with a test subject being able to feel fear again after a period of not feeling fear?

    Or does it test variables to do with their recovery after/from a feeling of fear?

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