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    #1

    pleasure in

    If I'm going to use the verb ''to pleasure", could I use it with the preposition "in" as in "I'm going to be pleasuring in seeing you for a while." to mean "seeking pleasure in"?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: pleasure in

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    If I'm going to use the verb ''to pleasure", could I use it with the preposition "in" as in "I'm going to be pleasuring in seeing you for a while."?
    No. "To pleasure" means "to give pleasure to someone else" or "to make someone else feel happy". It also has a sexual connotation so be careful how you use it.

    For your sentence, you probably need "I'm going to take pleasure in being with you for a while" or something similar, although "I'm going to enjoy your company for a while" would be much better.

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    #3

    Re: pleasure in

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No. "To pleasure" means "to give pleasure to someone else" or "to make someone else feel happy". It also has a sexual connotation so be careful how you use it.

    For your sentence, you probably need "I'm going to take pleasure in being with you for a while" or something similar, although "I'm going to enjoy your company for a while" would be much better.
    "" Responses in letters to the editor included such remarks as these: critics of Levin's ilk " serve only the continued dominance of a particular gender, class, and culture " by appealing to pleasure in literary study (Daniel Boyarin, 1991)" Would it be conveying any sexual meaning here?

    Furthermore, my Webster gives two definitions that are not sex related. 1)to take pleasure: delight 2)to seek pleasure
    Last edited by ostap77; 09-Feb-2012 at 22:56.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: pleasure in

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "" Responses in letters to the editor included such remarks as these: critics of Levin's ilk " serve only the continued dominance of a particular gender, class, and culture " by appealing to pleasure in literary study (Daniel Boyarin, 1991)" Would it be conveying any sexual meaning here?

    Furthermore, my Webster gives two definitions that are not sex related. 1)to take pleasure: delight 2)to seek pleasure
    "To take pleasure" and "to seek pleasure" are not the same as "to pleasure".

    I think "appealing to pleasure in literary study" should be broken down into "appealing to + pleasure + in + literary study".

    Do you understand what "to appeal to" means?

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    #5

    Re: pleasure in

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "To take pleasure" and "to seek pleasure" are not the same as "to pleasure".

    I think "appealing to pleasure in literary study" should be broken down into "appealing to + pleasure + in + literary study".

    Do you understand what "to appeal to" means?
    Yes. There were the two intransitive definitions given by the Webster dictionary. I guess it can be interpreted both ways.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: pleasure in

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Yes. There were the two intransitive definitions given by the Webster dictionary. I guess it can be interpreted both ways.
    But you haven't said what these phrases were definitions of.
    Besides "to pleasure someone/thing" is not intransitive. And you can't use "to pleasure" intrasitively. In your quote of Boyarin, "pleasure" is a noun.

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