Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. Newbie
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Feb 2012
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Abstract Nouns

    Would the following words (commonly used in Math) be classified as abstract nouns?

    1. DISTANCE: We only see, touch etc. objects that possess distance, but not distance itself. That would, I assume apply equally to the nouns: width, height and length which would also be abstract.

    WEIGHT and VOLUME: Ditto for these two. We only see, touch feel objects that possess them.

    QUANTITY: We do not see, hear, touch quantity. Only the objects that are seen to have a quantity.

    MONEY: Is money an abstract concept? Coins and notes are visible and tactile, but money isn't.

    TIME: Is certainly abstract.

    PLACE VALUES: e.g. Hundreds, Tens and Ones. Aren't these abstract ideas?

    I shall be extremely grateful for your clarification/confirmation, Thank you!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 173
    #2

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    Many abstract nouns can be re-conceptualised as concrete nouns eg.

    Abstract
    Distance makes the heart grow fonder.

    Concrete
    He ran different distances.

    Check this out on page 3.
    Last edited by mxreader; 10-Feb-2012 at 04:03. Reason: fix URL

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 1,507
    #3

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    I am a little puzzled as to why this post is categorized as a question about grammar.

    The abstract/concrete distinction (unlike, e.g. that of count/noncount) has no direct bearing on grammar...

  2. AlexAD's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    #4

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    I might be wrong but I guess that might have something to do with the article to be used with those words.
    Last edited by AlexAD; 10-Feb-2012 at 08:53.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #5

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    The abstract/concrete distinction (unlike, e.g. that of count/noncount) has no direct bearing on grammar...
    I considerthis falls under the broad heading of grammar. What would you call it?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 1,507
    #6

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I considerthis falls under the broad heading of grammar. What would you call it?
    Semantics. 'Abstract' and 'concrete' are types of meaning.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #7

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    Semantics. 'Abstract' and 'concrete' are types of meaning.
    Indeed, but, as definitions such as those below can be found in many dictionaries, I think it's reasonable enough for a learner to think that the question of concrete and abstract nouns could be seen as falling 'under the broad heading of grammar'.

    the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology, sometimes also phonology and semantics - Definition of grammar | Collins English Dictionary

    A book containing the morphologic, syntactic, and semantic rules for a specific language - grammar - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo! Education

    the whole system and structure of a language or of languages in general, usually taken as consisting of syntax and morphology (including inflections) and sometimes also phonology and semantics - Definition for grammar - Oxford Dictionaries Online (World English)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 1,507
    #8

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Indeed, but, as definitions such as those below can be found in many dictionaries, I think it's reasonable enough for a learner to think that the question of concrete and abstract nouns could be seen as falling 'under the broad heading of grammar'.
    Semantics is clearly only marginally included under the heading of grammar, but if you accept a definition of 'grammar' so broad as to be virtually meaningless, then, yes, I suppose it is reasonable.

    EOC

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #9

    Re: Abstract Nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    Semantics is clearly only marginally included under the heading of grammar, but if you accept a definition of 'grammar' so broad as to be virtually meaningless, then, yes, I suppose it is reasonable.
    I am happy to go along with definitions provided by many dictionaries.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] abstract nouns
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Jul-2008, 16:53
  2. abstract nouns
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Nov-2007, 13:11
  3. abstract nouns
    By kahhong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Apr-2006, 14:00
  4. abstract nouns
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Sep-2004, 21:50
  5. abstract nouns
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-Nov-2003, 04:22

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •