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    #1

    simple present

    Hi,

    Speakers occasionally use Simple Present to talk about scheduled events in the near future. This is most commonly done when talking about public transportation, but it can be used with other scheduled events as well.

    The train leaves tonight at 6 PM.
    The bus does not arrive at 11 AM, it arrives at 11 PM.
    When do we board the plane?
    The party starts at 8 o'clock.

    (They are all OK)

    My question is can we construct a sentence with the adverb of time 'now' ?

    Ameley: Do you know when the party starts?
    Sarrah: Don't worry...It starts now.

    Thanks...

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: simple present

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    My question is can we construct a sentence with the adverb of time 'now' ?

    Ameley: Do you know when the party starts?
    Sarrah: Don't worry...It starts now.
    Yes

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    #3

    Re: simple present

    ENGLISH PAGE - Simple Present

    Speakers sometimes use the Simple Present to express the idea that an action is happening or is not happening now. This can only be done with Non-Continuous Verbs and certain Mixed Verbs.

    Could you please check the page? I have been confused because I read 'this can only be done with Non-Continuous Verbs and certain Mixed Verbs'. Does the verb 'start' comprise it?
    Such as:
    I am here now.
    She is not here now.
    He needs help right now.
    He does not need help now.
    He has his passport in his hand.
    Do you have your passport with you?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: simple present

    Quote Originally Posted by aysaa View Post
    Speakers sometimes use the Simple Present to express the idea that an action is happening or is not happening now. This can only be done with Non-Continuous Verbs and certain Mixed Verbs.
    Not true.

    I have been confused because I read 'this can only be done with Non-Continuous Verbs and certain Mixed Verbs'. Does the verb 'start' comprise it?Do these include the verb 'start'?
    The terms 'normal', 'non-continuous' and 'mixed' are not standard and are, in my opinion, unhelpful. The information contained in those notes is sometimes inaccurate.

    'Start' is a a verb denoting an event rather than a state; it can be used in continuous forms:

    The performance starts/is starting in two minutes.

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