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    #1

    Does "voted present" mean "voted that the present law be maintained"?

    Context:

    Out of the 300 members of Parliament, 199 voted yes, 74 voted no, 5 voted present while 22 were absent.

    More:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/13/wo...s.html?_r=1&hp

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    #2

    Re: Does "voted present" mean "voted that the present law be maintained"?

    No, it means they voted "I am here" when asked a yes/no question.

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    #3

    Re: Does "voted present" mean "voted that the present law be maintained"?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    No, it means they voted "I am here" when asked a yes/no question.
    I've never heard of that. That's obviously an abstention. Is that the normal way to abstain? I suppose it has some profound historical significance.

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    #4

    Re: Does "voted present" mean "voted that the present law be maintained"?

    It's usually used when a politician doesn't want to be "on the record" for opponents to use his vote against him. A form of cowardice, in other words.

    See this article on the practice in Illinois:

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=18348437

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    #5

    Re: Does "voted present" mean "voted that the present law be maintained"?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    It's usually used when a politician doesn't want to be "on the record" for opponents to use his vote against him. A form of cowardice, in other words.

    See this article on the practice in Illinois:

    Examining Obama's 'Present' Votes in Illinois : NPR

    Cool stuff.
    Thank you.

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    #6

    Re: Does "voted present" mean "voted that the present law be maintained"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I've never heard of that. That's obviously an abstention. Is that the normal way to abstain? I suppose it has some profound historical significance.
    New to me too.

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