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    #1

    stands postponed/ postponed

    Hi ,

    What is the difference between:


    1) Todays match stands postponed.

    2) Todays match is postponed


    Can someone please explain?

    Thanks,
    Ganesh

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: stands postponed/ postponed

    Quote Originally Posted by ganesh85 View Post
    Hi ,

    What is the difference between:


    1) Today's match stands postponed.

    2) Today's match is postponed


    Can someone please explain?

    Thanks,
    Ganesh
    I'd say they mean the same. #1 is not very likely to be used though.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: stands postponed/ postponed

    Please note the apostrophes bhaisahab has added. At my screen resolution, they are very tiny, but they are important.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: stands postponed/ postponed

    Quote Originally Posted by ganesh85 View Post
    Hi ,

    What is the difference between:


    1) Todays match stands postponed.

    2) Todays match is postponed


    Can someone please explain?

    Thanks,
    Ganesh
    I suspect the context may be the rugby international in Paris last Saturday. At the time of postponement (10 minutes before kick-off) they didnt know what day it was to be rescheduled for. Possibly the speaker/writer/announcer thought that the 'stands'/'is' distinction carried the extra information '[but we don't yet know when till]'. I don't think it does support that implication, but I can imagine someone may have thought it might.

    Now that it 'is postponed to 4 March' I think we've seen the last of 'stands'!

    b

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